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Old 12-20-2008, 04:50 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by choose2bhappy View Post
The Doctor at the out-patient clinic I had gone to diagnosed me with OCD. He put me on Celexa. I hated it and felt like a zombie in quicksand. I stopped taking it on my own and had horrible mood swings for a few weeks, then the relapse, now I am feeling good.
A staff member confided in me that the Dr diagnoses EVERYONE with OCD and prescribes celexa to them. It is pretty alarming. I am no fan of anti-depressants from personal experience....but I needed help and I prayed and I thought this Dr and those pills were the life raft.

I just needed to learn to swim. Still treading water though!
I have severe OCD and take meds. I had the same reaction as you to most of the SSRI anti-depressants, but Prozac doesn't give me any side effects and helps enough to allow me to function somewhat normally.
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Old 12-20-2008, 06:14 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Sugah
I wonder, if my brain were scanned, if these deficiencies in the limbic system would still be present? Is the 12 step model of recovery a means to change brain
chemistry?
Yes, I think if the 12 steps would bring up more about brain chemistry and homeostasis and less about isuses many more people would be helped!!!
Your brain would most likely show subnormal results. However((((Sugah)))) you have learned to adapt and you have done a wonderful job of getting yourself back. My brain would also most likely show sub normal results.

I am sure of one thing I would rather be sub normal.

((((IOStorm)))) good for you in standing up for yourself!!!!

(((((((Doorknob)))))) at least you are aware of what is happening and your journey is not over.

((((Chooose2bhappy)))) so glad you learned to swim.

((((nogard))))I am glad you are taking as it comes and so glad you are here!!!

((((chiynita)))) thank you so much for your valuable input!!

((((pam08))))) looking good gal and I can tell you are on the right path.

(((((Horselover)))) thank you so much for your support you are so cool.

(((((cassandra)))) that was a very good question you asked thank you so much I would hate to think that someone would have wondered about that and not asked.
((((anton))))I hope we all stay mad and stick together to change the way people treat us and discriminate against us and treat us as though we are worthless
((((mac911))))) you as well thank you for the great question.

((((RZ))))) couldn't be the same place without your humorous way up bringing up the truth!!!

Look at all these beautiful people here getting it WOW I am amazed at you all
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Old 12-20-2008, 06:44 PM   #23 (permalink)
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addict before drugs? that's me! I didnt know all the scientific exactings....but it's me.

Thanks for the explanations...I think my folks would benefit from what you posted...they are not addicts. (I'm adopted) This type of information can help them with what they may not understand about addiction.

Thank you,
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:07 AM   #24 (permalink)
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My father was a heavy drinker, but I never saw him "drunk", his brother was called "Nip", due to him going thru a bottle of whisky a day. My sister heads for glass of wine within minutes of getting home from work and easily goes thru 2 bottles or more of wine each night.
I have had years of heavily drinking with my xah, and have recently demolished half a bottle of whisky when so distraught I just didn't think about what I was doing. That was the first wipe-out for me in over 30 years.

My abf's family has 4 generations of alcoholics, that abf knows of. His brother doesn't drink at all, says he realised 10 years ago that he was heading down the same road as his dad and abf, so quit without any help.

I have read lots re alcoholism and using that and personal knowledge, I believe that there is a gene that can be passed down, that predisposes towards alcohol disfunction. Precisely how it does, science is still trying to find out.

It would be wonderful, if there was a test we could have, early in life, that told us if we were at risk. Unfortunately for now, the only way we find out is generally well after any addiction has us in it's stinking grip.

God bless
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:37 AM   #25 (permalink)
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My first "drug" was food. Took that away with gastric bypass and I never dealt with my addiction so I just moved on to alcohol and perscription meds.

I'm just glad today that I can work a good program and not over do anything, except for a lot of laughs.
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Old 12-21-2008, 01:12 AM   #26 (permalink)
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When I was ten, I couldn't wait to become of legal age so I could smoke cigarettes.
I became a full-on smoker by the age of thirteen and have never quit longer than five day since.
I got into pot very early on, and I found a cheap and easy way to get 'high', which was by not going to sleep. I realized now that I always liked to be in an altered state. Being normal is just too boring and painful. I guess this makes me an addict!
I never thought so before, but now the definition makes much more sense. Kudos!
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Old 12-21-2008, 04:40 AM   #27 (permalink)
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I don't think we will be able to rely on medical science to help us there is just too much money in keeping us addicted and cycling thru the criminal justice system in in rehab programs.

This is why I advocate so much to get our bodied healthy and stop eating refined sugar and flour or anything that has an added sweetener of any kind, don't allow any dentist to put mercury filings in your mouth or in your children's mouths,eat low on the food chain, eat organic everything including dairy and meat. Quit smoking even if you have to go to a state run detox unit to do it. Do not allow your children to have vaccine with theramasol(mercury) in it insist that they order it without it for your children do not sign anything that says you will not sue if your child is damaged by vaccine this is a sure fire sign that they are intending to give your child a vaccine with mercury in it

UNDERSTAND, feel and know that your brain is different. Once you have detoxed over half your battle has been won! Become aware of your behavior learn to recognize your sub conscience driving you to get your drug of choice and know that food, sex,gambling ect ect all can be switched out to become your drug of choice. If you feel you must go to a therapist go to one that uses cognitive behavior therapy you do not need to rehash all the crap you need to learn how to make good choices. It does not matter how low you got or how much being sick took from you. You can get it all back and more.

It is the raising of our neuro-transmitter levels that makes us sick not our low levels.

Science is comparing our brains to whatever they think normal is we are different The chemical levels in our brains makes us who we are the good stuff and the bad stuff. Yes it is hereditary. The war on drugs is a war on people like us and we have to stand up and not take their crap anymore. In our numbers is what makes us strong which is why meetings are a good thing. We are the cream of the crop folks not the bottom of the barrel we are creative, intelligent,sensitive, we are human don't let the government take this away from you. It is time we stopped being ashamed and that we stop letting society shame us and discriminate against us.
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Old 12-22-2008, 11:48 AM   #28 (permalink)
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If you want to be sickened at how they treat addicts like animals google: SAFPF Austin Chronicle, It's terrible what they do to these women in the name of treatment. Basically punished for being addicts. Went through this myself when I was younger and it is an ugly side of our social paradigm. I am tired of "The Addict" being beaten up by society instead of being given a little compassion and help. I could go on about this all day but I will end my rant here.
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Old 12-22-2008, 03:23 PM   #29 (permalink)
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((((Anton))))

I know it makes me sick too. It keeps me posting here if I can possibly say the right thing for just one person to get it all this typing I do will be worth it!!!

I have a brother who has been in the system most of his life. Please pray for him if you can. I know that he doesn't feel good about himself. He is going to AA these days. I am trying to stay out of his business it is so tempting to want to give him advise...
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Old 12-22-2008, 04:34 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Splendra,

You mentined something that I have long suspected is at the heart of the matter of emotional disorders and addiction. You mentioned your brother "doesn't feel good about himself". This is such a simple statement but I think it is vital for a person to appreciate themself and realize that they are human. We all make mistakes but guilt or low self esteem can crush a person's spirit. This is an important observation, I think.

This reminds me so much of my sister, she is on methadone and fighting a heroin addiction. She isn't doing very well. She is so great but she just doesn't see it and that has always been her problem. She was abused growing up and when she was a teenager, she got the "tough love" approach which ended up making her more self conscious and confused.

I really do hope your brother does well, life is hard enough without us humans making it that much tougher on ourselves. I think our corrections system is, for the most part, a failure and doesn't benefit society as it is meant to. I have heard this from inmates and from prison guards, everyone involved thinks it's a sick joke.

I think people should be shown how to appreciate themselves instead of being treated as criminals for being fallable human beings. And possibly more importantly, people have to want to help themselves. Our society has been set against "addicts" and treat them as if they are sub-human. They are subsequently punished when that is exactly what they don't need. I did a little reading and it appears that AA didn't purport the idea of the "criminal" addict, this apparently came about when certain psychologists deemed addicts "vicious" rather than "victims". I think we should always treat people with dignity and leave this idea of sub-humans by the wayside.
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Old 12-23-2008, 12:03 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Like I said earlier what would happen if they started treating heart patients or people with kidney failure the same way addicts are treated with legal battles and prison sentences?

In saying this am trying to illustrate the ridiculousness of charging sick people with a crime.

I will pray for your sister ((((Anton))))
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Old 12-23-2008, 02:22 PM   #32 (permalink)
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I learned cognitive therapy was such a big help to me when I tried some even before I stopped using drugs. That's when I came to fully realize no matter much I wanted to change my thinking...it was the feelings I was trying to control. That's when I had the epiphany of why I wasn't feeling better even after the miracle of learning how to change my mind.

When I fully understood it I understood why I couldnt feel better about life and myself until I stopped using anything that was poisoning my body. First I stopped shop lifting....( I could do that with just cognitive therapy alone ) then I stopped using drugs and was able to stay clean because the cognitive boost allowed me to get involved in NA and making the application of the 12 steps.

My desire to learn a knew way to live was already rewarding me. I'd stopped shop lifting (stealing), I was able to abstain from use of any mind or mood altering chemicals... and the most clear evidence is that 11 months into my recovery from narcotics addiction I stopped smoking cigarettes.

As I made the effort to the best of my ability I learned what addiction means to me directly. I set the cigarettes down with the same desire to rid myself of the other addictive behaviors.

I am currently developing the desire to quit caffeine.

Amazing what I can do with some desire and changed thinking.

One of the biggest changes is that I make reasonable decisions today....as opposed to having reactions to feelings which are inevitable. So I'm not bouncing around the emotional stage...Im living life with clear headed decisions and am responsible for them.

Merry Christmas!
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:32 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Like I said earlier what would happen if they started treating heart patients or people with kidney failure the same way addicts are treated with legal battles and prison sentences?

In saying this am trying to illustrate the ridiculousness of charging sick people with a crime.

I will pray for your sister ((((Anton))))
Thank you,

If things keep going the way of non-regulation, I think people with these serious diseases will be treated as if they are criminals or at least that they were irresponsible and are the cause of their malady.

Smoking cigarrettes, lung cancer, could have quit and therefore doesn't get treatment. You are costing taxpayers money.

Eating fast food, heart disease, could have stopped eating, go to the end of the line. You are costing taxpayers money.

Drinking, liver problems, should have stopped drinking, feel lucky to not be in jail. You are costing taxpayers money.

Corporations aren't held to standards of being responsible for the same things individuals are. This is a dangerous standard.

People should be accountable for their actions but the environment and circumstances should be taken into consideration.
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Old 12-24-2008, 09:27 AM   #34 (permalink)
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I am an addict and now that I am clean and sober I see my addiction coming out in other ways..such as over exercising, spending sprees, dieting, becoming co-dependant to SO and his behaviors.
Yes, yes, yes. Me too.

That's the way I am. I am trying my best to stay grateful, instead of filling the void with WHATEVER. It's a ME problem, not a drug problem.
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Old 12-24-2008, 04:49 PM   #35 (permalink)
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((((LaDita)))) I hear ya

(((((Jadmack))))Even though they know it is a hereditary condition they still haven't figured out what to do about it and I don't think I would trust my brain to them if they said they did know what to do about it.


((((Missybunns)))) thanks for posting about your experience with CBT I hope you will post a lot more about it. To me this a very valuable therapy and it does work very congrats to you for also being able to quit smoking.

((((Anton)))) you are just so right. I do not trust the medical professional to lord over my health. I would not doubt at all if they would be able to figure out a way to sue me if they made me sick. The health care system is screwed big time all the drugs they prescribe are for the most part terrible I would not dispense them to my worst enemy. I wish people would rise up against the BIG PHARMA and stop taking their bull hockey... I could go on and on but I will try to stop now....

((((James13)))) Keep plugging away it sounds like you are doing very well.
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Old 12-28-2008, 03:00 AM   #36 (permalink)
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Hmmmm.

Off the subject a bit, but have you ever wondered what would happen to addiction if about 50 people were stuck on a deserted island (not like that LOST show) and didn't have any access to drugs, alcohol or anything else addictive? Just had to survive and get along to live.

That scenario might provide some answers as to what makes an addict, or what the underlying problems are. I have often wondered if the purity of such a technology-free and society-free environment could draw us away from problems with addiction. On the other hand, would we just become addicted to competition, sex, eating or other things about our own human nature found on that island?

I guess my wonder is: could all of our stress in society be a big factor in our reaction to our environment in the form of addictive behaviors?
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Old 10-12-2009, 06:18 AM   #37 (permalink)
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**Splendra** I've just come across this thread and at last things are beginning to make sense, after all these years!

AA didn't work for me because a) the religious aspect and b) the constant bringing up of the past, and living in victim mode, without ever getting to the root of the problem.

I even began to think that maybe something traumatic did happen to me in childhood and I had blocked it out, which is crazy. I was constantly looking at my past to find a reason for my addiction.

It was no use saying to me just accept it......I need to understand fully what is wrong with me.

I aslo spent too much time there, neglecting my family life.

I'm still a bit confused though. Are you saying a change in behaviour can have an effect on the chemistry in the brain? My cure is to control my emotions and behaviours? I need to know how to do this without AA, can you help please?

What is your source for this information and does the WHO recognise this theory? Where can I find more information?

I hated being called an alcoholic as I knew if it wasn't alcohol it would be something else, e.g. food, shopping, excessive exercising. I know at AA they would say that alcohol was only a symptom but then never explained further adding to the confusion.

I don't mind admitting I have an addictive personality because it makes sense.

I agree it would make sense to stop focussing on issues and look to look at Brain Chemistry and why we are addicts in the first place.

I can't wait to find out more about this and to try and find a way to live normally.
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Old 10-12-2009, 08:10 AM   #38 (permalink)
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Please see if this linkk is helpful to you KOOKS

How We Get Addicted - TIME

All my best ..
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Old 10-12-2009, 08:54 AM   #39 (permalink)
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Hello, KOOKS. I do a secular recovery of sorts. I use SR, therapy, prescription meds for depression, read self-help books/internet, take pictures...etc. Anything and everything to stay well. I spend a lot of time thinking. It's taken some time for me to come as far as I have and I still have a long way to go.

I have found that staying in contact with people who understand or those willing to help is important. That need is satisfied through this web site and my therapist.

You can check out the secular section of SR if you like. There are some members who work a SMART recovery, CBT, etc. There are several options.

I take recovery as an all-I-can-eat buffet. A little of this...a bit of that and so on.

Take it easy.
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Old 10-12-2009, 10:22 AM   #40 (permalink)
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Thanks Carol, that looks a really interesting article. I had a scan through it, I'm going to print it off and have a good read.

Bamboozle, Thanks for sharing how you cope with your recovery. It all makes sense to me but it's just where to start and how to keep it all going on a regular basis.

Sailorjohn had asked me what my plan is, I know he is right I just need to get motivated. I think I should start by asking my GP to refer me to a therapist.
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