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Sobriety takes a lot of work!

Old 07-07-2017, 03:03 PM
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IMHO, quitting alcohol is a process. For most people, quitting doesn't happen overnight. The reality is that there are always setbacks to trying anything new. I don't think I've met anybody where their path to sobriety went smoothly, but I'm sure it happens. I also tried the scientific approach to sobriety, but eventually realized that more needed to be done to add on to that knowledge. I also tried asking tons of questions at AA meetings, but soon found out that wasn't going to work either. Finding an approach to sobriety takes time for many of us. Everybody's different, but I always did best on any venture when I got honest but firm advise instead of criticism. The important thing is to believe in yourself, stay focused and never, never give up. John
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Old 07-07-2017, 03:25 PM
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bronzie, do you actually want to quit drinking?

cause these posts from you certainly doesn't make it sound that way.

Sobriety is not one drink. It is NONE. Ever. Again.

If I did what you did, I might as well pull a pin on a grenade and drop it at my feet.
Yikes. Be careful.
You're not playing with fire... you're stepping right in it.
Rethink your plan if SOBRIETY is your goal.
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Old 07-07-2017, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by 2muchpain View Post
IMHO, quitting alcohol is a process. For most people, quitting doesn't happen overnight. The reality is that there are always setbacks to trying anything new. I don't think I've met anybody where their path to sobriety went smoothly, but I'm sure it happens. I also tried the scientific approach to sobriety, but eventually realized that more needed to be done to add on to that knowledge. I also tried asking tons of questions at AA meetings, but soon found out that wasn't going to work either. Finding an approach to sobriety takes time for many of us. Everybody's different, but I always did best on any venture when I got honest but firm advise instead of criticism. The important thing is to believe in yourself, stay focused and never, never give up. John
No, quitting drinking is a single definitive action, it does actually happen over night. If yesterday I drank and today I decided never to do it again, I quit, and it happened over night.

Recovery takes time, but it takes even longer if you never start because you keep on drinking.

Someone once told me it was okay to relapse because we're alcoholics, that's what we do. It's not.
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Old 07-07-2017, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by BrendaChenowyth View Post
No, quitting drinking is a single definitive action, it does actually happen over night. If yesterday I drank and today I decided never to do it again, I quit, and it happened over night.

Recovery takes time, but it takes even longer if you never start because you keep on drinking.

Someone once told me it was okay to relapse because we're alcoholics, that's what we do. It's not.
I understand what you are saying and I don't disagree with you but I think everybody's situation is different. Some people are lucky enough to have family and friends to support them. Other's do not. That makes a big difference. Some people are alone in their struggle and it's not always a choice. Sure, there are many programs out there that offer support, but at the end of the day, you are alone to deal with it. Sadly, I think this is something that happens a lot. For example; years ago I had family and friends around to support me. For several reasons, that support is gone. When I had that support, I couldn't understand why people just don't quit. Now I understand. That's why I try hard not to judge anybody's situation. It used to be easy for me to point fingers and say what's your problem? Just do it. Not anymore. John
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Old 07-07-2017, 04:07 PM
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PS. That's why I said how important it is to stay strong, stay focused and believe in yourself because for some people, that's all they have. John
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Old 07-07-2017, 07:16 PM
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" I walked away, came back in a little bit to have another drink, which mostly just gave me anxiety because I know that I am not a drinker anymore, "

bronzie, you really can't have it both ways.

when you're not a drinker, you don't drink.
when you come back to have ' another drink', you're still a drinker.

your thinking isn't in line with the facts.

grasping what was factually true served me better than the stuff i wanted to be true.
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Old 07-08-2017, 12:18 AM
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Originally Posted by 2muchpain View Post
I understand what you are saying and I don't disagree with you but I think everybody's situation is different. Some people are lucky enough to have family and friends to support them. Other's do not. That makes a big difference. Some people are alone in their struggle and it's not always a choice. Sure, there are many programs out there that offer support, but at the end of the day, you are alone to deal with it. Sadly, I think this is something that happens a lot. For example; years ago I had family and friends around to support me. For several reasons, that support is gone. When I had that support, I couldn't understand why people just don't quit. Now I understand. That's why I try hard not to judge anybody's situation. It used to be easy for me to point fingers and say what's your problem? Just do it. Not anymore. John
Exactly, John. People find sobriety through different paths because everyone has different situations in their lives.
No, I don't believe it's "okay" to relapse, "because we are alcoholics," as someone above mentioned. But the reality is that relapse happens, which is why so many methods in the rehabilitation industry have such low success rates. When people say, "why don't you just quit," like it's an easy decision for an addict to just snap their fingers and say they're done, well the documentary I watched explains that in the first 5 minutes. It's not that easy, which is why so much research has gone into finding a method that actually works long term.
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Old 07-08-2017, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by 2muchpain View Post
PS. That's why I said how important it is to stay strong, stay focused and believe in yourself because for some people, that's all they have. John
Absolutely. Thank you. I am fortunate to have a supportive family, but that's not to say they truly understand the battle. Either way, I am the one who is responsible for my own success.
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Old 07-08-2017, 12:31 AM
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Originally Posted by BrendaChenowyth View Post
Your original post did not mention Naltrexone. Yes, it does what it's supposed to do. You still drank because you wanted to. No recovery work yet being done.
In my original post I state, "I have not drank since starting the naltrexone." And the title of my post is "Sobriety takes a lot of work" (I.e. Recovery work), which I mention is what I spend my time doing when not working.
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Old 07-08-2017, 03:58 AM
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Hi Bronzie.

I think with your history and your trouble staying sober, taking a drink, for whatever reason, or in whatever situation, is a bad idea, yeah?

Recovery's all about finding other healthier positive ways to deal with bad days, good days and all the other days in between.

I discovered a great number of great things about myself and my life through giving up alcohol for good.

I hope you will too.

D
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Old 07-08-2017, 04:00 AM
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Just a reminder to all - only gonna say this once.

The use of naltrexone in an abstinence based recovery approach is on topic here at SR.

Anything else is not, including other approaches at moderation using naltrexone.

Plenty of other sites around for folks to discuss those.

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Last edited by Dee74; 07-08-2017 at 04:38 AM.
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Old 07-08-2017, 04:10 AM
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Originally Posted by 2muchpain View Post
IMHO, quitting alcohol is a process. For most people, quitting doesn't happen overnight. The reality is that there are always setbacks to trying anything new. I don't think I've met anybody where their path to sobriety went smoothly, but I'm sure it happens. I also tried the scientific approach to sobriety, but eventually realized that more needed to be done to add on to that knowledge. I also tried asking tons of questions at AA meetings, but soon found out that wasn't going to work either. Finding an approach to sobriety takes time for many of us. Everybody's different, but I always did best on any venture when I got honest but firm advise instead of criticism. The important thing is to believe in yourself, stay focused and never, never give up. John
I highlighted these parts for a reason.

If by setbacks- you mean relapses- I respectfully disagree that they are necessary.

A path to sobriety that goes smoothly? I have had one. MEANING, my life while drinking was anything but smooth, but my life since quitting has been in the sense that my resolve was to never drink again. A smooth process to me doesn't mean easy, without side effects and physical healing, etc- it means a firm trajectory forward. It doesn't mean confidence in myself. That fails. It means a new worldview, and yes, mine is AA and I believe something greater than myself is necessary; for me this is God and my program.

I also don't understand what anyone means when they say "a scientific method to quitting." Huh? Learning about what the body goes through, "researching how much it can take" etc - that's not a method of quitting. It's methodology for drinking.

There is one solution to alcoholism: not drinking. Programs of choice, and help from others (professionals, other alcoholics, friends and family, etc) are the keys to maintaining sobriety when employed every single day.

Bottom line: each of us have to choose sobriety, over everything else, and no matter what. Our minds come up with all the thinking, "knowledge", justification, "mulling over the problem," WHATEVER....and keep us on a path to death.

[Off my soapbox now]
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Old 07-08-2017, 04:23 AM
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I tried to get away with no pruning of posts here but looks like thats not gonna fly, so...

In order to keep the thread on topic, I've removed some posts that were either not on topic, or referred to posts that were.

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Old 07-08-2017, 04:30 AM
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Sorry, Dee, if my last one was argumentative or [ ] other negative in tone. Sometimes my "bafflement" at comments people share overcomes my appropriate tone.
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Old 07-09-2017, 09:22 AM
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Hi Bronzie,

I haven't seen you in a bit, I am glad you are back and posting. I agree with Dee (somehow that always seems to happen.) about not drinking at all. I struggled with sobriety for a while as well, I had more Day Ones than o would like to admit to, and finally I knew that no matter the other supports I had in place I had to completely remove drinking as an option from my life. I have a little over 18 months sober, and I know that I cannot drink. I know that it will lead me back down a path that I do not want to travel again. Those first few weeks are hard, but just like an exercise routine you are building up those sober muscles each day that you do not drink.

I know you can do this, and I know that you want to because you are posting here, and taking other steps to achieve sobriety.

Looking forward to seeing you on here again. You used to check in the 24 hour thread sometimes, join us there again, lots of support and encouragement in that group.

❤️Delilah
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Old 07-09-2017, 01:27 PM
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Hope to hear from you soon Bronzie. John
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:45 PM
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Thanks guys. I'm here, still sober and I posted over in the 24 hour thread. I bought ginger ale and I'm drinking a lot of water and soda too, but NO alcohol whatsoever! I truly feel so much better without it.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:46 PM
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Glad to hear you're continuing on Bronzie

D
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Old 07-13-2017, 11:47 AM
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I think the OP meant he had one beer, but several sips of that beer. Not five or six drinks total
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Old 07-13-2017, 01:05 PM
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Good for you Bronzie! Glad you came back and you're drinking all my faves

F50, I think for most of us here, we'd be screwed at the first sip.

Or, truth be told, those many moments that came before the first sip that we had a chance to change our mind.
Not everyone is lucky enough to make it back.

Keep going bronzie, life will get better if you keep at it!
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