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Day 5

Old 04-02-2010, 06:48 AM
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Day 5

Well day 5 has arrived. I've been doing pretty well, which makes me think that maybe I wasn't as bad as I thought I was? I even went to dinner with some girlfriends last night, and while they were all drinking, I just stuck to diet coke. I also explained to them my decision to stop drinking - letting them know that although I'm not certain I had reached full-on alcoholism, I could sort of foresee myself going down a bad path that was starting with some serious binge drinking, blacking out, and all in all treating the people I love in a way that they did not deserve to be treated. And the worst part was that I was never able to remember it.

So my first night out with friends was a success, I actually didn't really feel the need to drink an alcoholic beverage. I was able to really enjoy my friends, laugh with them, and remember every minute. I didn't have to worry about driving myself home, or feeling like crap the next day. I even got up this morning at 6am and got to work really early!

All I have to say is that I'm really happy I've made this decision. And while I understand that my fight to kick this habit is likely much easier than some others here on this board, I'm very proud of myself. It was nice that I have friends who are supportive, and while they choose to continue to drink, they understand my priorities, and my concerns about the way I had been behaving.

I hope this isn't just a "beginner's high" and that I can keep going with this attitude. Anyone have any tips to keep the spirits up?
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:03 AM
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What helps me is just living in Today. Not regretting yesterday or worrying about tomorrow, just living for today as if it's all I've got. Congrats on your five day start to a better sober life.
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:10 AM
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Hi.

I'm on day 6 and feeling great.

I've been drinking every day for about 24 years, and I finally had enough.

I joined this forum because this first week of sobriety has been too easy, and I'm worried that once it gets difficult I may fall off the water wagon.

I'm so happy to be sober.
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:23 AM
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I found that of my own will, I could often go a couple days without drinking. I would then say to myself, "See, I'm not that bad. I didn't drink all weekend so I'm cool." So I'd have a drink. Perhaps I'd only have that one. Again, "See, I'm not that bad." But some time very soon, it would start again. Waking up with no memory of what happened. My girl asking me if I even remembered our conversation from the previous night. All around bad news.

This time, and it's different for lots of people, but I went back to AA. It's helped me tremendously. The fellowship, my sponsor, the experiences people share, the teachings in the Big Book...I personally could not have reached Day 9 without AA.
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Snarf View Post
I found that of my own will, I could often go a couple days without drinking. I would then say to myself, "See, I'm not that bad. I didn't drink all weekend so I'm cool." So I'd have a drink. Perhaps I'd only have that one. Again, "See, I'm not that bad." But some time very soon, it would start again. Waking up with no memory of what happened. My girl asking me if I even remembered our conversation from the previous night. All around bad news.

This time, and it's different for lots of people, but I went back to AA. It's helped me tremendously. The fellowship, my sponsor, the experiences people share, the teachings in the Big Book...I personally could not have reached Day 9 without AA.
I am afraid to go to AA - afraid that it is not really anonymous. I am a local business owner, am involved in town politics, and have children in the schools - what if some kids are in AA (forced by courts, police, etc.), and then they drop out of AA and then they go around town blabbing about me?
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Old 04-02-2010, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnBonham View Post
I am afraid to go to AA - afraid that it is not really anonymous. I am a local business owner, am involved in town politics, and have children in the schools - what if some kids are in AA (forced by courts, police, etc.), and then they drop out of AA and then they go around town blabbing about me?
I'm afraid I don't really know how to answer that, JB. I'm not in that position. I work in a restaurant and go to school, plus I live in Atlanta, which is fairly huge with 1200 AA meetings a week. I'm certainly in a much different position than you. That's why I say that AA helped me, but I won't tell someone else they need to do it because circumstances are always different.
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Old 04-02-2010, 09:32 AM
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Congratulations to all of you!

A good friend I met in early recovery said to me: Sobriety is like a pregnancy; when the pregnancy is over, it doesn't stop there.

Everyone's recovery program is as unique and individual as they are. It's not a one-size-fits-all.

If AA is something you want to try and are worried about anonymity, venture out of town for meetings. I know doctors and lawyers who do this. They all would've traveled miles and miles to drink so they're willing to do what it takes to live life fully in recovery.

I think the 'feeling good right after stopping drinking' can be a result of a number of things but since what goes up must come down, I agree that it won't always be this way - it's a false sense of security that alcohol plays to lure us back into thinking we can control it or take a break from it anytime - getting sober again won't feel like crap. Uhmm. Not so much.

Strictly speaking for me, in early sobriety, I found it best to not put myself in vulnerable situations where alcohol is present - it was like the saying goes: If you continue going into the barbershop, eventually you'll get a haircut.

My experience on developing a feeling-good-everyday-program is to do things that recenter the mind, body and spirit since they're all parts of the same unit. If one part fails, it affects the others.

Peace & Progress ~
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Old 04-02-2010, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by HumbleBee View Post

My experience on developing a feeling-good-everyday-program is to do things that recenter the mind, body and spirit since they're all parts of the same unit. If one part fails, it affects the others.

Peace & Progress ~
Thank you for these wise words. Hopefully I can keep my spirits up when things get harder...
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:17 PM
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Congrats on your decision to get sober and your sober time. Keep up the good work.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:29 PM
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Hi GreenEyedLady, JohnB and others - Well done on starting the journey.

As many have said, stopping drinking is really the easy part. The hard part is living a life where you are happy to not drink.

The key for me is working on my recovery, actively and every day.

I too had "an easy time at quitting". But, then I almost relapsed at 6 months for all the reasons you read about - just the cunning nature of alcohol.

When I work with others during their first few days and they tell me that "it is going well and they are surprised how easy it is", I tell them that this is a good time to begin building the tools that they will need when it becomes less easy. Just like learning a new skill, you will eventually "hit a brick wall" and will need to have the tools to overcome it.

There are many people who start sounding as you do and then in a week, a month, a year, even 10 years, find themselves back out there and even worse off. Many people come back to SR with DUIs, pending court dates, or broken homes.

I don't want to scare people, but alcohol is truly cunning, baffling, and powerful. It is a very formidable foe and one that you don't want to underestimate.

I built the tools through AA and SR, but there are other ways too.

I just ask you to take your great feelings today and leverage them for your future when you may need some extra support.

You can't do this alone.

Glad you are here. Keep us updated.
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Old 04-02-2010, 03:00 PM
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Lots of good advice in this thread already.

If I could impart just one thing it's be vigilant...you all know you have a problem or else you wouldn't be here - that problem never goes away IMO, but you'll try to convince yourself it has. We all did.

So many people get complacent and find themselves back at square one..and some of them, sadly, never make it back...

5-6 days is great - but it's not the end of the journey....it can be the fantastic beginning to a brand new life, tho...

D
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