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Archive for the ‘Addiction Treatment’ Category

Al-Anon

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Al-Anon is an international program whose purpose is to support the family and friends of those recovering from alcoholism. It was founded because it is generally accepted that the family of an alcoholic tends to be dysfunctional and also needs recovery.

Al-Anon’s program is the same 12 Steps as Alcoholics Anonymous, but family and friends recognize they are powerless over the alcohol their alcoholic consumes, and, in fact, are also powerless over the alcoholic. The basic text of Al-Anon is One Day At A Time in Al-Anon. Al-Anon members meet regularly to share their experience strength and hope.

Meetings or groups are found in 115 countries around the world. They range in size from a few people, to as many as 25 or more. Most groups meet once a week. Meeting styles include: speaker meetings where one or two members share the story of their recovery from a podium; discussion meetings where members share their experience with a particular topic, and step studies where members discuss their experience working with the 12 Steps.

Membership in Al-Anon is informal. The only requirement for membership is that one has a family member or friend who is alcoholic. Anonymity is taken seriously, protecting both the Al-Anon member and the alcoholic.

It is important to recognize that Al-Anon is NOT designed to show someone how to get an alcoholic to stop drinking. Rather, its purpose is to show family and friends how to recover from the effects of living in a family with an alcoholic, whether the alcoholic is in recovery or not.

Christians in Recovery

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Christians in Recovery (CIR) is an international organization of Christians who work to help other Christians recover from alcoholism, drug abuse, overeating and other addictive behaviors. Their program is based on the belief that the Bible “is the inspired, infallible, utilimately (sic) authoritative Word of God.”

CIR uses a version of the 12 Steps. For example, they include addictions and dysfunctions and make reference to the Bible in their Steps. CIR members meet regularly, usually at least weekly, and meetings are found in the United States, Canada and other countries. Their meetings may include Bible study as well as work with the CIR 12 Steps. Meeting lists can be found online and through Christian Churches.

Alateen

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Alateen is aimed at teenagers who have a family member or friend who is alcoholic. Each Alateen group is sponsored by at least one Al-Anon member. Working the 12 Steps, teens learn about the disease of alcoholism, how to detach from the family problems caused by alcoholism, how to protect themselves and how to give and receive support from other teens in similar situations.

Alateen members meet regularly, usually once a week and often concurrently but separately with an Al-Anon group. . Meeting styles include: speaker meetings where one or two members share the story of their recovery from a podium; discussion meetings where members share their experience with a particular topic, and step studies where members discuss their experience working with the 12 Steps.

Membership in Alateen is informal. The only requirement for membership is that the teenager has a family member or friend who is alcoholic. Anonymity is taken seriously, protecting Alateen members, Al-Anon members and the alcoholic.

It is important the teen recognize that Alateen is NOT designed to show someone how to get an alcoholic to stop drinking. Rather, its purpose is to show teens how to recover from the effects of living in a family with an alcoholic, whether the alcoholic is in recovery or not.

Narcotics Anonymous Defined

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Narcotics Anonymous, also known as NA, grew out of Alcoholics Anonymous. Where AA limits its program to dealing with alcohol, NA members work with any substance abuse problem.

The NA program uses the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, substituting the word addiction for the word, alcohol. The NA program is spelled out in their basic text, Narcotics Anonymous, often referred to as the NA Big Book.

NA meetings or groups are found almost 100 countries. They range in size from a few people, to as many as 100 or more. Most groups meet once a week. Meeting styles include: speaker meetings where one or two members share the story of their addiction and recovery from a podium; discussion meetings where members share their experience with a particular topic, and step studies where members discuss their experience working with the 12 Steps. There are also Big Book studies and meetings for special interest groups like women only, men only, gay and lesbian only, etc. All meetings are based, one-way or another, on the sharing of members experience, strength and hope.

Membership in NA is informal. A person becomes a member when they decide they want to stop using drugs and begin attending meetings. There is no registration; no attendance is taken, although the group’s secretary may note the number of people in the room. The commitment to anonymity is taken seriously and people can attend NA meetings with little fear that others, outside the meetings, will find out they have joined.

NA meetings can be found in various ways. There are meeting lists on the web. In the United States, Narcotics Anonymous can be found in the white pages of most telephone books; a call to information will also usually result in a phone number where meetings can be located. Meetings in most western countries, and some non-western countries can be found in similar ways.

Cocaine Anonymous

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Cocaine Anonymous, also known as CA, grew out of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. CA’s purpose is to help those who are addicted to cocaine, in all its forms, and other mind-altering substances recover from their addiction(s).

The CA program uses the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, substituting the phrase mind-altering substances for the word, alcohol. The CA program is spelled out in their basic text, Hope, Faith and Courage, often referred to as the CA Big Book.

CA meetings or groups are found in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada. They range in size from a few people, to as many as 25or more. Most groups meet once a week. Meeting styles include: speaker meetings where one or two members share the story of their addiction and recovery from a podium; discussion meetings where members share their experience with a particular topic, and step studies where members discuss their experience working with the 12 Steps. All meetings are based, one-way or another, on the sharing of members experience, strength and hope.

Membership in CA is informal. A person becomes a member when they decide they want to stop using drugs and begin attending meetings. There is no registration; no attendance is taken, although the group’s secretary may note the number of people in the room. The commitment to anonymity is taken seriously and people can attend CA meetings with little fear that others, outside the meetings, will find out they have joined.

CA meetings can be found in various ways. There are meeting lists on the web. In the United States, Cocaine Anonymous can be found in the white pages of many telephone books; a call to information will also usually result in a phone number where meetings can be located. Meetings in Canada and the UK can be found in similar ways.

Alcoholics Anonymous Defined

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Alcoholics Anonymous, also known as AA, is the original 12 Step group. It consists of men and women who come together voluntarily to achieve and maintain sobriety. The goal is total abstinence from alcohol, one day at a time. The method consists of meetings and working the 12 Steps. The 12 Steps are found in the book, Alcoholics Anonymous, also known as the Big Book.

Meetings or groups are found in almost every country of the world. They range in size from a few people, to as many as 100 or more. Most groups meet once a week. Meeting styles include: speaker meetings where one or two members share the story of their alcoholism and recovery from a podium; discussion meetings where members share their experience with a particular topic, and step studies where members discuss their experience working with the 12 Steps. There are also Big Book studies and meetings for special interest groups like women only, men only, gay and lesbian only, etc. All meetings are based, one-way or another, on the sharing of members experience, strength and hope.

Membership in AA is informal. A person becomes a member when they decide they want to stop drinking and begin attending meetings. There is no registration; no attendance is taken, although the group’s secretary may note the number of people in the room. The commitment to anonymity is taken seriously and people can attend AA meetings with little fear that others, outside the meetings, will find out they have joined.

AA meetings can be found in various ways. There are meeting lists on the web. In the United States, Alcoholics Anonymous can be found in the white pages of most telephone books; a call to information will also usually result in a phone number where meetings can be located. Meetings in most western countries, and some non-western countries can be found in similar ways.

Overeaters Anonymous

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Overeaters Anonymous, also known as OA, grew out of Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12 Step groups when people working other programs discovered they could use to the same principles to end their addiction to over eating.

The OA program uses the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, substituting the word food for the word, alcohol. The OA program is spelled out in their basic text, Overeaters Anonymous, often referred to as the OA Big Book.

OA meetings or groups are found more than 52 countries. They range in size from a few people, to as many as 50 or more. Most groups meet once a week. Meeting styles include: speaker meetings where one or two members share the story of their addiction and recovery from a podium; discussion meetings where members share their experience with a particular topic, and step studies where members discuss their experience working with the 12 Steps. There are also Big Book studies and meetings for special interest groups like women only, men only, gay and lesbian only, etc. All meetings are based, one-way or another, on the sharing of members experience, strength and hope.

Membership in OA is informal. A person becomes a member when they decide they want to stop abusing food and begin attending meetings. There is no registration; no attendance is taken, although the group’s secretary may note the number of people in the room. The commitment to anonymity is taken seriously and people can attend OA meetings with little fear that others, outside the meetings, will find out they have joined.

OA meetings can be found in various ways. There are meeting lists on the web. In the United States, Overeaters Anonymous can be found in the white pages of most telephone books; a call to information will also usually result in a phone number where meetings can be located. Meetings in most western countries, and some non-western countries can be found in similar ways.

12 Step Alternatives

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Although Alcoholics Anonymous and the other 12 Step groups like Narcotics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, etc. are the best known recovery organizations, there are alternatives to the 12 Step Movement. Most of these were created out of the recognition that one size does not fit all. Many of them use a more psychological approach than the 12 Step programs do; most have some sort of group support model with regular group meetings for members. Some are actively opposed to the religious or spiritual tone found in 12 Step groups, while a few embrace a specific kind of spirituality.

Each organization has its own flavor and methods.

Best known alternatives to the 12 Step groups include: Smart Recovery, Rational Recovery, LifeRing Secular Recovery, Secular Organization for Recovery (SOS), the Lenaire Technique, etc.

All of these groups, and others, have websites and are often listed in the white pages of the phone book in areas where they are active.

Adolescent Treatment

Monday, January 27th, 2014

The goals of adolescent treatment are the same as treatment for the general, adult population—detox, therapy and education that stop the addictive behavior and help the client grow up. Because of the client’s ages, however, the approach is different. Generally, teenagers are grouped by age; the most common groupings are 13-17 and 18-mid-20s. Some adolescent treatment centers require special evaluation for boys who are 13 or 14 to assess their ability to benefit from the program.

Although outpatient adolescent treatment is available, there is general agreement that a residential stay of at least 30 days is preferable for many teens and some programs run nine months or even longer. The theory is that adolescent drug abuse is often at least in part a response to family dynamics. By removing the teenager from the family, both the family and the adolescent have an opportunity to heal. Most centers also provide help for the family in the form of meetings and, sometimes, group therapy sessions. Structured visits by family members are usually considered an important part of the healing process.

Given the length of stay, the center also has to continue the academic education of the client as well as help them deal with their addiction. Most have arrangements with their state’s department of education to assure the teenager will receive proper credit.

Many adolescent treatment centers include vigorous outdoor activities, including wilderness camping, working with horses and other livestock, etc., as a way to help the teen learn self-reliance and mutual support, as well as personal growth through adventure. There are, however, programs based in urban areas.

The 12 Step model is used by many treatment centers and these centers may include trips to outside 12 Step meetings.

Some adolescent treatment centers deal with addiction only, while others will work with dual diagnosed teens and teens with health problems.

12 Step Groups Defined

Monday, January 27th, 2014

The 12 Step groups are the best known of the recovery support groups. Based on Alcoholics Anonymous, addicts attend support meetings where, one way or another, the 12 Steps are discussed. Those committed to recovery adopt the ideas that by them selves, addicts are powerless over their addiction, and that by working the 12 Steps their addiction can be arrested.

There are literally dozens of 12 Step Groups. The best known are probably Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), and Narcotics Anonymous (NA), but almost every popular addictive drug also has its own group, including Cocaine Anonymous, Marijuana Anonymous, Crystal Meth Anonymous, etc. There are often subsets of these groups, like women only, gay and lesbian, men only, etc.

All of them use Alcoholics Anonymous’ 12 Steps, substituting the words alcohol and alcoholism for the drug they are dealing with.

Membership in 12 Step groups is informal. The only requirement is a desire to stop using the addictive drug and a member becomes a member simply by expressing this desire. There are no membership records kept. A key principal for 12 Steps group is anonymity for members. People can attend without fear that their addiction will be revealed to anyone outside the group. There are no costs associated with membership in a 12 Step group although the groups do accept voluntary contributions to meet their expenses.
Meetings range from small groups of two or three members to groups in large metropolitan areas that claim 500 members or more. The style of meetings ranges from speaker meetings, where one or two people share their stories from a podium, to discussion and step studies, which invite participation from those present.

Meeting schedules and directions to meetings can be found on the web. In many communities, 12 step groups are also listed in the white pages of the telephone book, usually listed by the name of the substance they address.