How to Practice Gratitude More Than Ever This Thanksgiving

By Toshia Humphries is a Texan freelance writer, artist, life coach and talk radio co-host of Girl Power Hour on Blog Talk Radio.

Sober Recovery Expert Author

For many, Thanksgiving is a day filled with family, friends and festive spreads of food. People gather together to enjoy a meal, spend quality time together and give thanks.

Some of the tradition revolves around religious beliefs; prayers of thanks offered to a Higher Power for blessings bestowed throughout the year. For others, it’s a holiday simply based on the historical account of Pilgrims and Natives coming together to share their bountiful harvest, putting differences aside to enjoy a day of thanks. And, for some, the latter is a questionable account at best, making the holiday itself suspect.

The relationship we’ve been working to restore with ourselves in recovery is the most vital. For those of us who have learned to love ourselves unconditionally, our Thanksgiving table need only have room for one.

However, regardless of faith, historical facts or the presence of family, it's important to have an official day of gratitude, especially for those of us in recovery. Gratitude should be a part of everyday life, and Thanksgiving offers unique opportunities to begin a daily practice.

What is There to Be Thankful For?

Recovery itself is certainly something to be thankful for. Many of us nearly lost ourselves completely to active addiction, codependency and/or the issues that come with being adult children of addicts. No matter the reasons we find ourselves in recovery today, we can be grateful that we have found ourselves at all.

And, though many of us have lost friends, family members and significant others to the disease, the consequences of our actions or the process of recovery and reality of sobriety, we do have ourselves. The latter is likely something we have never had before. That is why it’s a top priority on the gratitude list.

From You to Others

The relationship we’ve been working to restore with ourselves in recovery is the most vital. For those of us who have learned to love ourselves unconditionally, our Thanksgiving table need only have room for one.

Regardless of faith, historical facts or the presence of family, it's important to have an official day of gratitude, especially for those of us in recovery.

That isn’t to say we shouldn’t make room for those in need of community. Quite the contrary. We should reach out to our recovery family and open our hearts and homes to those in need of our company.

However, none of us require a fancy feast with large gatherings of people to prevent feeling alone. We are well aware we were once surrounded by loved ones – friends, family and significant others – and we never felt more empty or lonely. We didn’t have ourselves. But, now we do.

This Year is Different

So, on Thanksgiving Day, take the time to reflect on that fact. Instead of looking around at all that is missing, look inward at all that’s been found. Focus on abundance, rather than lack. Shift your perspective to one of gratitude, being thankful for all that you now have in this moment and for that which you have the opportunity to pursue in the future.

Be thankful for you, and let Thanksgiving kick off a daily practice of speaking gratitude for yourself and your recovery. After all, your presence is something that was lost to everyone including yourself in active addiction, but you are returning home in recovery. Not to a physical place or geographical location, but to the truth that is you.

If nothing else, be grateful for that. Your presence truly is the greatest gift.

If you or someone you know is seeking help from addiction, please visit our directory of treatment centers or call 800-891-8171 to speak to a treatment specialist.

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