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Allan Carr's Easy Way

Old 03-12-2012, 12:04 AM
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Allan Carr's Easy Way

Has anyone followed any of Allen Carr's books? I read "The Easy Way to Stop Smoking" and "The Easy Way to Control Alcohol." I have not smoked a cigarette since November 1st 2011 and I had recently decided to be free from all the problems alcohol has caused in my life and I highly reccomend "The Easy Way" to people who are indifferent to 12 step programs. I actually attend AA twice a week, some things I find very inspiring, but I do not follow the steps. That is just me though. I reccomend those two books if you would like different way. Instead of feeling deprived from alcohol and cigarettes, I feel happy to be free from the poisons!
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Old 03-12-2012, 12:25 AM
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Evan, I agree with you . Thses are really good books .
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Old 03-12-2012, 01:14 AM
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I read the easy way to stop drinking recently it is an interesting take on the subject. There is a thread about it in the book club forums if you were wanting to read some others opinions here.
http://www.soberrecovery.com/forums/...-thoughts.html

happy reading
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Old 03-12-2012, 02:21 AM
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I'm checking it out from the library.
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Old 03-12-2012, 12:27 PM
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Easy Way to quit smoking has worked for me for almost a year now after trying all kinds of other ways using NRT for the previous 15 yrs, it's such common sense and really is easy; I imagine the book for quitting drinking would be just as straight forward as it just makes sense.
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Old 03-12-2012, 12:40 PM
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I was never a smoker but EasyWay seems to be highly effective for cigarettes.

His alcohol books are very effective at making you changes your perception of alcohol. The problem for me was, even though I agreed that there were no advantages to alcohol, "something" would always pull me back.
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Old 03-12-2012, 03:57 PM
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Welcome to SoberRecovery EvanEv.

I've been thinking about ordering the book. Aside from being recovered of drug addiction, learning about other recovery methods fascinates me.
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Old 03-12-2012, 04:07 PM
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Allan carr has been My major help , at 60 days here and NEVER going back.
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Old 03-19-2012, 02:26 PM
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His smoking book is fab! I stopped after reading it and not looked back in 15yrs! My son also quit after reading it nearly 2yrs ago.

The drinking book didn't have the same effect the first time I read it. But then neither did the smoking book first time round. I've recently purchased the drinking book again and will read it again when I'm in the right frame of mind.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:17 PM
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I am 40 days out today. But just started reading his book tonite. I'm interested in how he blames the alcohol for addiction and not the person. But.in a good way..Brings the reality of the drug and society's relationship to it into the light of day. Takes the shame and confusion away.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Pixy1 View Post
The drinking book didn't have the same effect the first time I read it. But then neither did the smoking book first time round. I've recently purchased the drinking book again and will read it again when I'm in the right frame of mind.
The books do have a hypnotic effect; it's the way he repeats certain points and the way certain messages are in larger, bold type. In fact, if you go to see an EasyWay therapist face-to-face they do use some hypnosis towards the end to help you retain what you've learned. I've not been myself but I understand that is how it works.
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Old 05-07-2012, 10:29 PM
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Overall, I liked Carr's book. It changed my perception of alcohol and motivated me to consider quitting.

However, for me, the main flaw in the book is that it denies that there is any pleasure in drinking (and that we've just been conditioned by society to believe there is). This didn't ring true for me.

The approach that has worked for me is Rational Recovery by Jack Trimpey, which says that, ultimately, the ONLY reason we drink is for the pleasure, although we often give other reasons and excuses. This I could relate to and is quite liberating.

Now I see alcohol as a pleasure that I gladly don't indulge in anymore.

Carr attempts to remove the desire to drink by trying to show how there's no pleasure in it and that by understanding the trap you will be free.

It didn't work for me but he does make some good points and it's worth a read.
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:02 AM
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Originally Posted by harry101 View Post
Overall, I liked Carr's book. It changed my perception of alcohol and motivated me to consider quitting.

However, for me, the main flaw in the book is that it denies that there is any pleasure in drinking (and that we've just been conditioned by society to believe there is). This didn't ring true for me.

The approach that has worked for me is Rational Recovery by Jack Trimpey, which says that, ultimately, the ONLY reason we drink is for the pleasure, although we often give other reasons and excuses. This I could relate to and is quite liberating.

Now I see alcohol as a pleasure that I gladly don't indulge in anymore.

Carr attempts to remove the desire to drink by trying to show how there's no pleasure in it and that by understanding the trap you will be free.

It didn't work for me but he does make some good points and it's worth a read.
Your view and experience is almost identical to mine. I have pondered the Allen Carr argument that there are no benefits to alcohol a lot and have come to this conclusion:

To use the word “benefits” when describing alcohol is a matter of semantics. Carr argues the so-called pleasure is when the drug ends a low caused by the previous dose—like removing a pair of tight shoes. To a certain extent, this is true, especially if you're hungover as the most recent hit delays the detox process.

However, you cannot deny that when go back to drinking after a dry spell, a few drinks will bring about some bodily changes that are very pleasant even though there was previously no trace of alcohol in your body. Carr would argue this is a misconception whereas Trimpey says this is genuine pleasure.

I agree with Trimpey but the question is, does pleasure equal benefits?

I don't know how prolific they are elsewhere, but in the UK short term, high interest loans are ubiquitous. I'm talking over 2,000% APR. I liken alcohol to these. I can't argue alcohol isn't pleasurable any more than I can argue it's not worth having any money. However it is never going to be worth it for me to borrow money on such lousy terms. Likewise, that first hour or so after having a few drinks certainly feels good, but everything that follows shortly after (and lasts longer) certainly isn't. It depends on how you cut it but to me it's pleasurable for a short while but not beneficial.
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by kanamit View Post
Your view and experience is almost identical to mine. I have pondered the Allen Carr argument that there are no benefits to alcohol a lot and have come to this conclusion:

To use the word “benefits” when describing alcohol is a matter of semantics. Carr argues the so-called pleasure is when the drug ends a low caused by the previous dose—like removing a pair of tight shoes. To a certain extent, this is true, especially if you're hungover as the most recent hit delays the detox process.

However, you cannot deny that when go back to drinking after a dry spell, a few drinks will bring about some bodily changes that are very pleasant even though there was previously no trace of alcohol in your body. Carr would argue this is a misconception whereas Trimpey says this is genuine pleasure.

I agree with Trimpey but the question is, does pleasure equal benefits?

I don't know how prolific they are elsewhere, but in the UK short term, high interest loans are ubiquitous. I'm talking over 2,000% APR. I liken alcohol to these. I can't argue alcohol isn't pleasurable any more than I can argue it's not worth having any money. However it is never going to be worth it for me to borrow money on such lousy terms. Likewise, that first hour or so after having a few drinks certainly feels good, but everything that follows shortly after (and lasts longer) certainly isn't. It depends on how you cut it but to me it's pleasurable for a short while but not beneficial.



Great analogy.
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