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Buddhist approach to recovery

Old 08-31-2008, 08:38 AM
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things as it is
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Buddhist approach to recovery

The Four Noble Truths:

The Truth of Suffering (a better word might be "stressfulness")
The Truth of the Cause of Suffering
The Truth of the End of Suffering
The Truth of the Path leading to the End of Suffering

The Eightfold Path Leading to the End of Suffering:

Right Understanding
Right Thoughts
Right Speech
Right Action
Right Livelihood
Right Effort
Right Mindfulness
Right Concentration

I find these teachings useful in my recovery and closely related to the intentions of the 12 steps. They both are to be practiced and close attention must be paid to what you are doing and thinking (heedfulness).

Here are a few links to easy to understand explanations:

Buddhism Principles: The Four Noble Truths - ZENGUIDE.COM
Zen & Buddhism: The Eight Fold Path - ZENGUIDE.COM

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Old 08-31-2008, 09:17 AM
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Thanks Zendust...it is a tall order! It seems right now that it is very hard for me to really see things as they really are...so many things seem to stand in the way of clear seeing. I have begun to practice sitting again and right now there seems to be a whole lot of clutter!

Sobriety is absolutely key to my ability to be awake...seing things as they really are doesn't seem to be possible when my senses are messed up...but there is so much more!

Thanks again
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Old 08-31-2008, 09:20 AM
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Thank you ananda. We are all in this together...and you've helped me a great deal already.

Gassho
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Old 09-06-2008, 07:15 AM
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Has anyone here heard of the "Sarpashana Sourcebook"?

Looks like it might be something useful to discuss on this forum. What do you think?
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Old 09-06-2008, 07:40 AM
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It looks very interesting. Did you read it?
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Old 09-06-2008, 09:21 AM
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I haven't heard of it..so don't know...Can you tell us a little about it?
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Old 09-06-2008, 09:26 AM
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Here is a link to the book.

But the whole site looks very interesting. Looks like I have something to do tonight!
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Old 09-06-2008, 09:46 AM
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I read cool water but I wasn't off the alchohol yet...was still struggling...it was so so to me...found 12 steps on buddha's path by laura S. more helpful for me.
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Old 09-06-2008, 03:12 PM
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The full text can be found at:

Sarpashana Sourcebook
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:44 PM
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The 12 Steps of Liberation

1. The truth of suffering. We experienced the truth of our addictions * our lives were unmanageable suffering.

2. The truth of the origin of suffering. We admit that we craved for and grasped onto addictions as our refuge.

3. The truth of the end of suffering. We came to see that complete cessation of craving and clinging at addictions is necessary.

4. The truth of the path. We made a decision to follow the way of liberation and to take refuge in our wakefulness, our truth, and our fellowship.

5. Right view. We made a searching and fearless review of our life. We are willing to acknowledge and proclaim our truth to ourselves, another human being and the community.

6. Right thought. We are mindful that we create the causes for suffering and liberation. Our goodness is indestructible.

7. Right speech. We purify, confess and ask for forgiveness straightforwardly and without judgment. We are willing to forgive others.

8. Right action. We make a list of all persons we harm and are willing and able to actively make amends to them all, unless to do so would be harmful.

9. Right livelihood. We simplify our lives, realizing we are all interconnected. We select a vocation that supports our recovery.

10. Right effort. We realize that continuing to follow this path, no matter what, is joyful effort.

11. Right mindfulness. Through prayer, meditation and action we will follow the path of kindness, being mindful moment by moment.

12. Right concentration. Open to the spirit of awakening as a result of these steps, we will carry this message to all people suffering with addictions.

Sorce: Lion's Roar Dharma Center Recovery Group
Sacramento Buddhist Meditation Center - Lion's Roar Dharma Center
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Old 09-06-2008, 09:17 PM
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Thank you so much for this thread, guys... It motivated me to order "12 steps on buddha's path", after linking to some of the sites you listed here. I'm still trying to find a "program". I think that for me, the winging-it school of thought (or, 1.Don't drink, 2. See step 1), will not be a path to long-term sobriety. So I'll give this one a look and see where it leads me!

It makes sense... the Buddhist emphasis on attachment leading to suffering, connected to desire to drink leading to my particular form of suffering, ie being a falling-apart alkie.
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Old 09-14-2008, 06:58 AM
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Geez! I didn't see your post zencat. Good stuff, thank you.
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:07 AM
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good audio on zen and 12 steps

Thanks for this thread and all the thoughtful posts, which have been helpful to me. Judith Ragir is a Zen Priest who has been in recovery for many years. She has been kind in putting these audio teachings on her website, and I have listened to them repeatedly. She has a wonderful sense of humor, and
speaks with wisdom and compassion. Hope you enjoy!

I cannot post links to other sites yet, so go to double u double u double u dot judith ragir dot org!
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by DharmaQueen View Post
Thanks for this thread and all the thoughtful posts, which have been helpful to me. Judith Ragir is a Zen Priest who has been in recovery for many years. She has been kind in putting these audio teachings on her website, and I have listened to them repeatedly. She has a wonderful sense of humor, and
speaks with wisdom and compassion. Hope you enjoy!

I cannot post links to other sites yet, so go to double u double u double u dot judith ragir dot org!
Here's the link: Zen Priest Judith Ragir

And welcome to the Secular Forum DharmaQueen.
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