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Doc wrote me a script.

Old 10-19-2017, 07:51 AM
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Doc wrote me a script.

Please note: im not asking for medical advice or anything clinical, just asking for experiences and thoughts.

Anyway, I had a drs appt. yesterday. I explained how I quit drinking cold turkey and all that. I was asked how im feeling, I told the truth, it's nice not being hungover everyday and I do feel ok sober but, I also explained about the insomnia, anxiety, and mild depression im suffering.

Long story short, after explaining all this along with my quitting alcohol cold turkey circumstances, the dr wrote me out a script for lexapro and klonopin. It was explained that these would help me through the anxiety spells and depression and can aid with withdrawal symptoms.

I have not filled the scripts. I'm afraid of getting addicted to something else, especially after still withdrawling off of alcohol. I'm very hesitant and was wondering if anybody here has experience with these types of prescriptions. Like, are they hard to get off of? Can they just be used when needed? Will they limit my daily functions?

Note: I did ask the dr all these same questions but was given very vague answers from someone who's probably never been in my shoes.

So any experiences would be greatly appreciated! The honest goods and bads from personal experiences.

Or also if you dont feel comfortable telling a story feel free to p.m. me.

Thanks again

Brighten

Last edited by BrightenMeUp; 10-19-2017 at 07:58 AM. Reason: ending
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:18 AM
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Lexapro is not something you can just take as needed. It takes a few weeks before you feel some results from that. To my knowledge it's not addictive. Klonopin on the other hand can be, and benzodiazepines like that and xanax can be difficult to come off of should you take them regularly for an extended period. I have taken xanax for years as needed, which isn't that often, but has helped me very much in short term situations.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Linners820 View Post
Lexapro is not something you can just take as needed. It takes a few weeks before you feel some results from that. To my knowledge it's not addictive. Klonopin on the other hand can be, and benzodiazepines like that and xanax can be difficult to come off of should you take them regularly for an extended period. I have taken xanax for years as needed, which isn't that often, but has helped me very much in short term situations.
Hi Linners,

Much appreciated info!! Thank you so much !!
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:22 AM
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Polling random people on an internet site isn't likely to generate meaningful results that would apply to you because everyone is different, and everyone's response to particular drugs is different.

In general, I'd say that if you've been sober for more than a few days and you're getting through withdrawal OK on your own and your symptoms aren't too severe, it might be good sober practice to give the drugs a pass for now.

Looking to a pill (or a drink) for an instant fix for feeling bad is what got a lot of us into trouble in the first place. Learning new coping strategies is a part of recovery.

That said, if your symptoms are severe and unmanageable or last a long time, the assistance that the drugs can provide may be essential enough to outweigh any risk of a new addiction. Only you can make that call.

Your anxiety, insomnia, and depression may just be part of acute withdrawal and work themselves out in time if you stay sober and do some work on recovery. Maybe give yourself a few weeks and see how it goes?

Of course, if you drink again, all bets are off.

Good luck!
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:25 AM
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I'll take the opposite tack from Linners'.

I've had prescriptions for xanax in the past and it was part of the reason why I went back to drinking. It sure felt good to blot out emotions with my little pill.

When I stopped drinking this last time I decided I wasn't going to take anything for the depression or anxiety. Or compulsions, lack of sleep, or ruminating or or or. There are always side-effects. I found other ways to deal with early sobriety. It was difficult, but I'm glad I did it that way. "Hard" taught me how to cope for the rest of my life using tools other than pills. My doctor is a "medical" doctor and has always (over) prescribed pills. That's what they went to school to learn to do.

I was perfectly formed. We are all a little off in one way or another and I had to learn to live with myself. I didn't want some person who saw me for 30 minutes a year to decide I was not right. Sure I had some depression. Who wouldn't after years of alcohol and stuffing my feelings?

I survived. Never again on the pills. It's all okay now. Perfect sleep, perfect weight, no anxiety to speak of, and no pills. It took some time, though - and work.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Andante View Post
Polling random people on an internet site isn't likely to generate meaningful results that would apply to you because everyone is different, and everyone's response to particular drugs is different.

In general, I'd say that if you've been sober for more than a few days and you're getting through withdrawal OK on your own and your symptoms aren't too severe, it might be good sober practice to give the drugs a pass for now.

Looking to a pill (or a drink) for an instant fix for feeling bad is what got a lot of us into trouble in the first place. Learning new coping strategies is a part of recovery.

That said, if your symptoms are severe and unmanageable or last a long time, the assistance that the drugs can provide may be essential enough to outweigh any risk of a new addiction. Only you can make that call.

Your anxiety, insomnia, and depression may just be part of acute withdrawal and work themselves out in time if you stay sober and do some work on recovery. Maybe give yourself a few weeks and see how it goes?

Of course, if you drink again, all bets are off.

Good luck!
I have no plans on drinking again why would you even bring that up?

I will give myself some time though. And I wasn't looking for a pill or any quick fix, I did not ask for the script.

And I feel "polling" people in my situation is a good real life way to get a feel for other's experiences. Of course it will be my decision in the end but it doesnt hurt ask about others experiences either.

Much thanks for your info!!
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by biminiblue View Post
I'll take the opposite tack from Linners'.

I've had prescriptions for xanax in the past and it was part of the reason why I went back to drinking. It sure felt good to blot out emotions with my little pill.

When I stopped drinking this last time I decided I wasn't going to take anything for the depression or anxiety. Or compulsions, lack of sleep, or ruminating or or or. There are always side-effects. I found other ways to deal with early sobriety. It was difficult, but I'm glad I did it that way. "Hard" taught me how to cope for the rest of my life using tools other than pills. My doctor is a "medical" doctor and has always (over) prescribed pills. That's what they went to school to learn to do.

I was perfectly formed. We are all a little off in one way or another and I had to learn to live with myself. I didn't want some person who saw me for 30 minutes a year to decide I was not right. Sure I had some depression. Who wouldn't after years of alcohol and stuffing my feelings?

I survived. Never again on the pills. It's all okay now. Perfect sleep, perfect weight, no anxiety to speak of, and no pills. It took some time, though - and work.
Excellent info thank you very much bimini!!!
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by BrightenMeUp View Post
I have no plans on drinking again why would you even bring that up?
Because the sad fact is that most people do. Including me. I wasn't a "one and done." I was about a "1,367,855 and done." Nothing personal -- I have every hope you'll succeed!
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Andante View Post
Because the sad fact is that most people do. Including me. I wasn't a "one and done." I was about a "1,367,855 and done." Nothing personal -- I have every hope you'll succeed!
Agreed, sorry if I took it the wrong way. I have failed before lots of times myself, never even made it past 3 days.

Thanks for the replies
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Andante View Post

In general, I'd say that if you've been sober for more than a few days and you're getting through withdrawal OK on your own and your symptoms aren't too severe, it might be good sober practice to give the drugs a pass for now.

Looking to a pill (or a drink) for an instant fix for feeling bad is what got a lot of us into trouble in the first place. Learning new coping strategies is a part of recovery.

That said, if your symptoms are severe and unmanageable or last a long time, the assistance that the drugs can provide may be essential enough to outweigh any risk of a new addiction. Only you can make that call.

Your anxiety, insomnia, and depression may just be part of acute withdrawal and work themselves out in time if you stay sober and do some work on recovery. Maybe give yourself a few weeks and see how it goes?
Agree. If you can manage without them, give it a shot. It's still early days and it may take some time before your body readjusts on its own.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by BrightenMeUp View Post
Agreed, sorry if I took it the wrong way. I have failed before lots of times myself, never even made it past 3 days.

Thanks for the replies
This time is different.

Believe that and it will be. Relapse is not a foregone conclusion.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:50 AM
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BMU,
I have no objections to medications in general and in fact take them myself. When people have told me they are a crutch, I don't think they've understood just how debilitating my anxiety and depression can be.

In any event, I'd advise you to see a psychiatrist who specializes in substance abuse. He or she will definitely not prescribe Klonopin (clonazepam) as it is indeed habit-forming and can be abused.

O
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by biminiblue View Post
This time is different.

Believe that and it will be. Relapse is not a foregone conclusion.
Well said bimini!! This time is different!
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Obladi View Post
BMU,
I have no objections to medications in general and in fact take them myself. When people have told me they are a crutch, I don't think they've understood just how debilitating my anxiety and depression can be.

In any event, I'd advise you to see a psychiatrist who specializes in substance abuse. He or she will definitely not prescribe Klonopin (clonazepam) as it is indeed habit-forming and can be abused.

O
Thank you Obladi!

I have never been to a psychiatrist. Is it mostly talk and listen type therapy?
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Old 10-19-2017, 09:55 AM
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In the US, my experience has been that psychiatrists just prescribe meds. My current guy is quite talkative/informative though.

He works as a team with my therapist.

I really like this approach.

O
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Old 10-19-2017, 10:00 AM
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Kind of tough the whole klonopin deal.....they are highly addictive ..If you think this is something you can perhaps get addicted to i'd refrain for awhile to see if your anxiety goes away as your brains starts to heal.
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Old 10-19-2017, 10:05 AM
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Thanks everyone for all the thoughts and input!! Much appreciated!
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Old 10-19-2017, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by BrightenMeUp View Post
I have never been to a psychiatrist. Is it mostly talk and listen type therapy?
It really depends on the psychiatrist ;-) Some are very proactive in prescribing meds, others not so much. Psychologists cannot prescribe meds so they work with therapy exclusively. I have personally found therapy/counseling to be a lot more effective than meds for help with my anxiety and addiction issues, but every person is different.

I was in a very similar situation to you, although I had quit drinking for almost a year before I sought help for my anxiety. I went to my doctor first and they immediately prescribed some meds without even considering therapy, I decided to pursue therapy on my own. I did try a med or 2 and they were somewhat helpful, but i personally feel that they only treat the symptoms..not then root of my anxiety.

Benzos are very, very dangerous for an addict...i'm kind of surprised your doctor prescribed them after telling him about your alcohol abuse problems. Benzos affect the brain in a very similar fashion to alcohol....some people equate them to booze in pill form actually.

Either way, coming here to get advice/experience and continuing to explore options with your doc or a counselor seems like a great idea.
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Old 10-19-2017, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Obladi View Post
BMU,
I have no objections to medications in general and in fact take them myself. When people have told me they are a crutch, I don't think they've understood just how debilitating my anxiety and depression can be.

In any event, I'd advise you to see a psychiatrist who specializes in substance abuse. He or she will definitely not prescribe Klonopin (clonazepam) as it is indeed habit-forming and can be abused.

O
Yes. It can be extremely debilitating and if someone is actually mentally ill, many times "doing things the hard way" just doesn't cut it. I've seen comments here about avoiding the use of medication and honestly, some have seemed to me to be quite condescending.
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Old 10-19-2017, 01:41 PM
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This is something I know far, far too well. I was on Lexapro for 15 years. I started drinking about 5 years after starting Lexapro. SSRI's are powerful drugs, they can and WILL change your brain chemistry. For some people they are lifesavers, for others they are as bad or worse than alcohol.

Coming off them can be *INCREDIBLY* difficult, people (like me) have debilitating panic attacks and other symptoms that are often worse than the ones we went on them for. Some people feel they can also lower your inhibitions, which can be a dangerous thing for people living with addiction.

That said, if you feel you need them, then as others have mentioned, these drugs can literally save lives for people who have real mental illness problems. I would just personally advise someone to really make sure they need them before they start, and stay in close contact with your DR. Good luck.
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