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Salary negotiations?

Old 04-15-2015, 04:08 AM
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Salary negotiations?

4 months sober and things are looking up. Made some changes in the past few weeks, eating better and started walking every day. I feel better.

Been a stay at home Mom for a year, and being sought after by a company to return to work for them. They have been trying to get me on board for months.

Need advice on negotiating a salary, thought this may be a good place for advice. I guess I was a highly functioning alcoholic :-)

I only want to return part time (25 hours a week). I would be the most experienced team member. I work in sales. But honestly, if I have to put my little one in daycare, the salary I am going to ask for is going to be high.

First time I have really been put in a position where they really want me and I am the most experienced candidate. Don't want to come in too high or too low.

Any suggestions welcome.
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Old 04-15-2015, 04:15 AM
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Be the first person to say a number. That becomes the starting point of the negotiation. It puts the other party in the position of negotiating away from the starting point.

If you're thinking 17 and they're thinking 14 then saying "20" as the opening number puts you in a much better position than if they say "12" as the opening number.

Congrats on 4 months sober, and GOOD LUCK!
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Old 04-15-2015, 04:32 AM
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There are salary calculators on the internet that can give you a general idea of what what people in your industry earn. These can be quite useful but I would also look at job vacancies for senior sales people and see what people are offering and go for the higher end of the scale. Calculate the cost of your child's daycare and make sure that you get the best money you can. When negotiating be gracious and firm. Decide privately what the lowest amount is you would accept and don't feel pressured to go beneath that. You are obviously valued by these people so value yourself. Good luck, I am very excited for you.x
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Old 04-15-2015, 04:42 AM
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Congratulations on four months! That's terrific. I have no experience in salary negotiations. Terrible at it and where I work had structured salaries when I began.

But, I do have experience with daycare issues. If you are contemplating a return to work, shop around to find out where you may place your children and find out the best fit and what the going rate might be. If you are seeking a private person, find out what they might charge. If it's a center, find out what their rates may be. Find out if they are flexible in hours.

If you will have set hours with the company you will start with, make sure they are family friendly because if one or both of your children becomes sick and can't go to daycare you will need to be able to call in to care for them or else make sure you have back up.

This isn't on point on what you asked but it's important. I suddenly and recently had to deal with both issues - finding day care at reasonable rates and having two sick children. Mine are in school full day but I needed someone to pick them up from school and watch them until I got home from work. They were sick over their spring break and my mother graciously watched them as we are so short staffed that I could not possibly call in to care for them. It was highly stressful to manage.

Good luck with your negotiations. I second Non's advice to go in first and go in higher. Also calculate any fees or costs you would not otherwise be paying except now you're working. Good luck!
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Old 04-15-2015, 05:40 AM
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Things you may want to take into account, before deciding on your final number, are the additional costs that will be associated with going back to work, and putting your child in daycare. Think about commuting expenses, clothing, money for lunches... It will not only be the cost of the daycare.

Before my son was born, I was a professional musician, on the road five days a week. After (my now ex wife) became pregnant with our son, I knew I would need to leave the music biz. At the time, I really wasn't qualified for anything that would pay all that well. After looking into daycare, had I taken any of the daytime jobs I found, I would have basically been working to pay the daycare bill, in other words, I'd have been working for someone else to raise our son. So, it just made sense that I would stay home during the day, and get nighttime jobs. Which is what I did until our son started school.

That said, everyone's situation is different.
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Old 04-15-2015, 05:43 AM
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Little difficult to say. What's the position?
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Old 04-15-2015, 06:14 AM
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a few general considerations;

Know what you need - never mind what the company's expectation is - know your own bottom line. Be willing to walk away if you don't see that bottom line met.

Know your BATNA (Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement). This means - if you DON'T take this gig - what's your next best thing? Your BATNA helps you weigh their offer against what else you may choose instead, helps you assess the relative value of any offer and helps you stay 'rooted' in confidence that you can walk away if you need to.

Know THEIR BATNA - negotiations are about compromise and arriving at mutually-beneficial outcomes. You need to have in mind what the employer's perspective is. If they don't hire you - what will they miss out on? What is their alternative? What is their likely willingness to choose that alternative over you.

Have a general understanding of your market value - use online references if you don't have a clear understanding of that from primary sources (like other job opportunities).

Know your OPTIONS - in addition to salary, many employers have other benefits that may come into play. You mentioned child care as an issue for me. Often, employers will have a child care benefit option. If you're unable to negotiate a salary above your strike point - then bring up 'other benefits'. "I think we have a great fit here and I'd love to be a part of your team. However, at the salary we're discussing, I'll be challenged to do my best for you. Are there any creative options we can discuss around child care allowance?". Sometimes companies have company-sponsored programs or can offer an allowance that includes tax breaks for the company..... so, go into the negotiation prepared to discuss non-cash benefits that offset your expenses.

Be prepared, be confident, be relaxed, be matter-of-fact, be enthusiastic and focused on the VALUE you bring and the VALUE you expect in return. And be willing to walk away respectfully if need be..... "I really wish we could find an agreeable outcome here. I believe I'd be a very strong asset to your team and would enjoy working here - unfortunately we just aren't in the right realm of value with these discussions. If something should change, please feel free to reach back out."

Good luck
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Old 04-15-2015, 08:45 AM
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Threeve is always a good place to start!!!

JK.......You've worked for them before, so perhaps explain to them exactly what you did here. Tell them about the situation with child, and how much you'd love to be part of their team again etc.......

As a headhunter in my previous life, the guy who speaks first loses. Make them say a number......then don't knee jerk react. Thank them and ask for a little time to consider - perhaps set a time to speak again. Consider what they've offered and decide if you should push for more or are happy to be back!!!

Good Luck!
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Old 04-15-2015, 08:47 AM
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Ask them what the salary range is for the position and then come in at the midpoint if possible
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Old 04-15-2015, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Flynbuy View Post
Threeve is always a good place to start!!!

JK.......You've worked for them before, so perhaps explain to them exactly what you did here. Tell them about the situation with child, and how much you'd love to be part of their team again etc.......

As a headhunter in my previous life, the guy who speaks first loses. Make them say a number......then don't knee jerk react. Thank them and ask for a little time to consider - perhaps set a time to speak again. Consider what they've offered and decide if you should push for more or are happy to be back!!!

Good Luck!

this is good input.

the other thing is to put off salary as long as possible.... make sure that they are totally sold on YOU as the ideal candidate. You don't want to be talking salary when they're still lukewarm on you. You want to talk salary as the final step once they believe that you're the messiah.
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Old 04-15-2015, 09:16 AM
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Lots of good advice although some of it is conflicting. Personally, I don't want to be the first to show my hand, so to speak. Also, FreeOwl's generalizations are gold. I don't know if it's still published, but while in graduate school in the early 80's I had to read a book titled Getting To Yes and it focused on the BATNA strategy. Having multiple graduate degrees I had to do a lot of reading and to this day I feel as if that book was one of the most important books I was tasked to read.

I wish you well and don't sell yourself short. Remember it's a two way street, they know you, and they want you.
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Old 04-15-2015, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Gonnachange View Post
Lots of good advice although some of it is conflicting. Personally, I don't want to be the first to show my hand, so to speak. Also, FreeOwl's generalizations are gold. I don't know if it's still published, but while in graduate school in the early 80's I had to read a book titled Getting To Yes and it focused on the BATNA strategy. Having multiple graduate degrees I had to do a lot of reading and to this day I feel as if that book was one of the most important books I was tasked to read.

I wish you well and don't sell yourself short. Remember it's a two way street, they know you, and they want you.
Getting to Yes and the BATNA stuff came out of the Harvard Negotiation Project and has been employed around the world in everything from corporate negotiations to hostage negotiation situations in the middle east.

I was trained on this stuff in New York by members of the Harvard team and a 6'6" tank of a man who has put these principles to work with a gun held to his head and others' lives at stake. The stuff works. Getting to Yes is a great book and those techniques have served me well in many situations over the years - from contracts to home purchases to hiring to divorce proceedings and even parenting toddlers.

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Old 04-15-2015, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by FreeOwl View Post
Getting to Yes and the BATNA stuff came out of the Harvard Negotiation Project and has been employed around the world in everything from corporate negotiations to hostage negotiation situations in the middle east.

I was trained on this stuff in New York by members of the Harvard team and a 6'6" tank of a man who has put these principles to work with a gun held to his head and others' lives at stake. The stuff works. Getting to Yes is a great book and those techniques have served me well in many situations over the years - from contracts to home purchases to hiring to divorce proceedings and even parenting toddlers.

I'm pretty sure I still have the book in one of my book cases in the basement and although I haven't looked at it in a long time, like you I've employed the principles often and in a variety of situations. Fortunately for me none involved having a gun to my head.
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Old 04-15-2015, 11:13 AM
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Way to go on 4 months sober good luck
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Old 04-15-2015, 11:27 AM
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Hi susieq

There are some good tips on salary.com and salaryexpert.com
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Old 04-15-2015, 03:35 PM
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Thanks so much--great advice and much to think about!!

Since I am at the library at least once a week with my little one, I will be looking for some of the book recommendations. Excited to get reading.

Again, thanks to everyone!!!
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Old 04-15-2015, 04:15 PM
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I must be the first person in history ever to get twice the salary she asked for. I based my "ask" on what was being offered for a similar job I had applied for recently (one that also would have required me to relocate to a very expensive locale). Imagine my shock when I got this job offer at twice that amount, AND the opportunity to work from my home.

Go figure. God looks out for lousy negotiators.
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