Go Back  SoberRecovery : Alcoholism Drug Addiction Help and Information > Friends and Family > Friends and Family of Alcoholics
Reload this Page >

What are some REGIONAL SLANG-Words/Phrases that are common in your area?

Blogs


Notices

What are some REGIONAL SLANG-Words/Phrases that are common in your area?

Old 12-05-2010, 11:26 AM
  # 41 (permalink)  
Rising from the Ashes
Thread Starter
 
Phoenixthebird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 451
I remember watching an episode of Family Fued a few years ago. Family Feud is an American television game show created by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman. Two families compete against each other in a contest to name the most popular responses to a survey-type question posed to 100 people. A family from Iowa were one of the contestants. They were to name the most common "breakfast foods". They all named famous brands of cereals such as Wheaties, Cheerios and Rice Krispies. (LOL)
Phoenixthebird is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Phoenixthebird For This Useful Post:
wicked (12-05-2010)
Old 12-05-2010, 11:31 AM
  # 42 (permalink)  
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bristol TN/VA
Posts: 12,262
Blog Entries: 5
old time americana that I haven't heard for many a year (from my granny) until I came here....

zinc = sink
icebox = refrigerator

from my dad:
"you'll sh!t and fall back in it"......a bad course of action planned
"want in one hand and sh!t in the other and see which fills up first"...self-explanatory! LOL
Live is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Live For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010), wicked (12-05-2010)
Old 12-05-2010, 11:55 AM
  # 43 (permalink)  
same planet...different world
 
barb dwyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Butte, America
Posts: 10,946
Blog Entries: 7
WOW.

I'm totally stealing 'scunnered' ... LOL LOVE THAT ONE !!!!

Up here in Butte -
we've got TONS of 'em
bnut you have to be in butte to get it.

Being a mining town ,
it's sister city is Belfast.
Literally.

But there's parts of the whole world here
that came to work in the mines.

For example:

we say 'see yas' ... which is only elsewhere found in Cornwall, England.

'above ground' ... means every day is a good day when you're above ground.
so if somebody says something and you're 'all over it'... as in every CELL in your body agrees, you say 'above ground, man'.

'tap 'er light' .... which is guaranteed to make everyone in the bar laugh (and probably buy you a round if you have good timing) because it's the guy who is loading the powder into the drillhole who is always admonished to 'tap 'er light' , when putting the cap onto the blast hole.....or he'll blow everyone there to kingdom come. Literally.
And has. In history here.

coyote - is NEVER pronounced Kie- yotie. EVER. it's "KYE-yote". no 'e'.
they'll peg you for a flatlander in a second if you slip up and say 'kie-yotie".

CRICK - is a small running stream of water. Never CREEK. Never EVER "CREEK".

Barrow ditch - the ditch that is dug by the govt alongside every public road in the country.

borrow me, borrowed me : loaned money. 'she borrowed me a twenty'. (I have NO idea how THAT grammatical nightmare got started.)
barb dwyer is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to barb dwyer For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010), wicked (12-05-2010)
Old 12-05-2010, 12:03 PM
  # 44 (permalink)  
Member
 
LaTeeDa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: behind the viewfinder...
Posts: 6,278
Originally Posted by Live View Post
"want in one hand and sh!t in the other and see which fills up first"...self-explanatory! LOL
LOL Live, I thought my dad was the only one who said that!

And his favorite thing to say when he was hungover:

"I feel like I been ate by a mountain lion and sh!t over a cliff!"

or "rode hard and put away wet."

This thread is great.

L
LaTeeDa is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to LaTeeDa For This Useful Post:
Live (12-05-2010), Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-05-2010, 12:10 PM
  # 45 (permalink)  
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bristol TN/VA
Posts: 12,262
Blog Entries: 5
hotel with bars = jail
Live is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Live For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-06-2010, 08:29 AM
  # 46 (permalink)  
Member
 
nodaybut2day's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Quebec
Posts: 2,708
Hmm, well, I live in the province of Québec which has its own VERY unique slang....I won't torture you all with it because you can't even begin to understand it if you don't speak French first (and even then, québécois slang totally MURDERS traditional French).

The only "slang" that comes to mind is politically based:

Bloques (or squares): refers to anglo canadians
Frogs: French quebecers
nodaybut2day is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to nodaybut2day For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-06-2010, 08:55 AM
  # 47 (permalink)  
Member
 
HoopNinja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 693
My dad was in the air force so I grew up all over:

scosh-just a little; so if you want to try something you are not sure you like--just give me a scosh

I'll have your guts for garters-you are in deep doo doo; like in--if you break grandmas antique bowl I'll have your guts for garters

Don't get your undies in a bundle/chill out-calm down

She's (he's--but it is usually she) dumb as a box of rocks-not too smart

In a pig's ear!--NO WAY!

Skank-woman who is just not someone anyone would want to hang out with (usually one woman refers to another using that name)

Skeezer-coke (drug) wh**e

Soda vs. pop--depends which part of Wisconsin you are from

Bubbler vs. fountain-depends on which part of Wisconsin you are from

Stop and Go Lights-stop light in Northern Wisconsin

Hairs--hair; as in I like your hairs (this used to crack me up when we lived in Northern WI-I always asked which ones)

Catch me F me shoes-very high spiked heels

Hotdish-casserole

Cry me a river-who cares?

Kiss my grits-kiss my a**

I am sure there are more. . .those are the ones that popped into my head instantly
HoopNinja is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to HoopNinja For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-06-2010, 09:25 AM
  # 48 (permalink)  
Member
 
JackNWA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 157
Born in Texas, raised in Oklahoma, and live now in Arkansas.

"Over yonder" - some distance away
"fixin to" - preparing to do something. As in "I'm fixin to go to the store".
"yant to?" - Do you want to?
JackNWA is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to JackNWA For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-06-2010, 08:41 PM
  # 49 (permalink)  
Dyankee
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 8
I'm from Massachusets - Don't Blame me!

Ah, lemme think!

Porch dog (opposite of hunting dog)
Ayeah - Yankee comment indicating you've been heard
Laid out in lavender - Put to rest...chewed out
Mamma's Mess - Casserole
Ugly as a toad - needs no explanation
Puckerbrush - what you're in if you go off the road
She means well - as in the road to hell is paved with good intentions
Swamp yankee - unprincipled poor white trash with no teeth and poor diction
who just cheated you out of your shorts
DamnYankee - my Mom was 12 yo before she knew this was two words
(her grandfather fought on the southern side in the Civil War)
Clammin - picking your nose
DYankee is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to DYankee For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-07-2010, 08:31 AM
  # 50 (permalink)  
Curled up in a good book...
 
bookwyrm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 1,542
Originally Posted by barb dwyer View Post
WOW.

I'm totally stealing 'scunnered' ... LOL LOVE THAT ONE !!!!
Steal away oh spiky one - I just hope you don't feel that way very often!!

For some older style Scots, have a look here: The Broons and Oor Wullie Home Page
bookwyrm is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to bookwyrm For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-07-2010, 10:22 AM
  # 51 (permalink)  
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6
Originally Posted by BumblingAlong View Post
We say "hydro", not electricity (eg; My hydro bill was high this month)
Ha! You must be from Eastern Canada! In the west we call it "power" bill
Teabouv is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Teabouv For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-07-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 10:50 AM
  # 52 (permalink)  
Member
 
LucyA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,017
This isn't regional slang, but it's about the English language, I thought it might amuse you as it did me when my friend sent it!

To all you lovers of language
An ode of English plurals
We'll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes,
But the plural of ox becomes oxen, not oxes.
One fowl is a goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of moose should never be meese.
You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of mice,
Yet the plural of house is houses, not hice.
If the plural of man is always called men,
Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen?
If I speak of my foot and show you my feet,
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?

If one is a tooth and a whole set are teeth,
Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth?
Then one may be that, and three would be those,
Yet hat in the plural would never be hose,
And the plural of cat is cats, not cose.
We speak of a brother and also of brethren,
But though we say mother, we never say methren.
Then the masculine pronouns are he, his and him,
But imagine the feminine: she, shis and shim!
************
Let's face it - English is a crazy language.
There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger;
neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
English muffins weren't invented in England.
We take English for granted, but if we explore its paradoxes,
we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square,
and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.
And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing,
grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham?
Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend?
If you have a bunch of odds and ends and
get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?
If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught?
If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?

Sometimes I think all the folks who grew up speaking English
should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane.
In what other language do people recite at a play and play at a recital?
We ship by truck but send cargo by ship.
We have noses that run and feet that smell.
We park in a driveway and drive in a parkway.
And how can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out, and
in which an alarm goes off by going on.
And in closing, if Father is Pop, how come Mother's not mop?
LucyA is offline  
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to LucyA For This Useful Post:
bookwyrm (12-19-2010), Phoenixthebird (12-19-2010), theuncertainty (12-19-2010), wicked (12-19-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 11:21 AM
  # 53 (permalink)  
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 132
Yes Teabouv,
I'm from Ontario!
BumblingAlong is offline  
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to BumblingAlong For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-19-2010), Teabouv (12-23-2010), wicked (12-19-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 12:39 PM
  # 54 (permalink)  
Rising from the Ashes
Thread Starter
 
Phoenixthebird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 451
Baltimore Slang

I previously lived nearby Baltimore. Maryland. Here are a few expressions that I commonly heard on the Baltimore City streets. When you hear... They mean...

Accent When 2 cars collide
Acts To request
Ball Mer The name of our city
Balled Ham Boiled ham
Balmorese What we're speaking
Beero Bureau (as in FBI)
Bulled Egg An egg cooked in water
Chest Peak A large body of water
Chimley Where Santa comes down
donobodylidea Don't nobody live here
Downey Owe Shin Summertime destination
Droodle Pork Druid Hill Park
Dug It bit the cat
Elfin Large pachyderm at zoo
Farn Gins Red trucks that put out fires
Five Oh Cop
Hollandtown Highland Town
Jayf X Route 83 or the Jones Falls Expressway
John Smith Joseph Smith
Looney Yum Fool Aluminum foil
Merlin Our state
Moral Stadium Memorial Stadium
Nap Lis State of Merlin capital
Old Bay What our crabs taste like
The Oreos Not a cookie, but our baseball team
Pockeybook Purse
Poh Lease Police
Poison Ivory Plant that gives you itchy skin
Ravens Cleveland Browns
Share Hot water that cleans you in the morning
Simonize Hospital Sinai hospital
Star Phone Styrofoam
Swan Road Shawan Road
Syringe Red light on top of ambulance
Tawlet Toilet
West Minister Nearby city of Westminster
Phoenixthebird is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Phoenixthebird For This Useful Post:
LucyA (12-19-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 12:51 PM
  # 55 (permalink)  
Member
 
LucyA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,017
I hate when people say ax or acts instead of ask, also filum instead of film really grates too!
LucyA is offline  
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to LucyA For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-19-2010), theuncertainty (12-19-2010), wicked (12-19-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 02:01 PM
  # 56 (permalink)  
Member
 
LucyA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,017
flummoxed, this was one my nan used to use.
I just love the word, it means sort of confused, taken aback, surprised in a nice way.
LucyA is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to LucyA For This Useful Post:
Phoenixthebird (12-19-2010), theuncertainty (12-19-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 02:49 PM
  # 57 (permalink)  
Rising from the Ashes
Thread Starter
 
Phoenixthebird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 451
I couldn't be from the Republic of Texas without mentioning TexMex. It's the cultural blending of Southern Texas and Northern Mexico. Here's just a few TexMex words. Roll the R's, stretch those N's, and make those J's sound as H's !!

BANO (bon-YO)
The second most important room of the CASA, the BATHROOM. In travelling to Mexico or Spain, this is the single most important word to remember. If you say to someone "Bano"? as in asking "where is A bathroom" and they say "No, muchas gracias", you are in trouble. Then pull out the phrase "Donde esta el bano?" and they will more than likely will point you in a direction where you shall commence to proceed!!

BIENVENIDOS (bee-in-vin-knee-THOSE)
We welcome you!! (Howdy, Hola, Yo!, etc)

BUENO (WHEN-o)
Good. OK. "An acknowledgement that everything is A-OK...."

CASA (KA-sa)
That dwelling that one calls HOME. Ever here the phrase "Mi casa is su casa"? Well if someone tells you that, it's about the highest compliment one can receive.

COCINA (ko-SEE-na)
The most important room in the casa, the KITCHEN.

COCINERA (ko-SEE-nair-uh)
Female cook.

COCINERO (ko-SEE-nair-o)
Male cook. In early pioneer days, the 'chuck wagon' on the trail drives was generally an aging cowboy who was the highest paid worker on the drive. In Tex-Mex history, he was referred to as the "cocinero", especially when of Spanish descent.

GRACIAS (GRAC-ee-us)
Thanks, thank you. Also Muchas Gracias is a whole lots' of thanks...

GRINGO (GREEN-go)
Tex-Mex for non-Mexican descendent. White face, American, anything but of Hispanic heritage. (Commonly used derogatorily)

HOLA (OL-ah)
Hello. Used in greeting another amigo or amiga.

LINGO (lean-GO)
The 'language' spoken. As in Tex-Mex is spoken here. No place to make a mistake or you'll be noticed right off.

TEJAS (tey-HAS)
The LONE STAR STATE, TEXAS. The word Tejas comes from the Hasinai Indian word which translates into friends and allies.

TORTILLERIA (TORE-tee-a-ree-uh)
A store that specializes in fresh ground, corn masa and tortillas as well as specialty items such as chicharones and barbacoa.
Phoenixthebird is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Phoenixthebird For This Useful Post:
LucyA (12-19-2010)
Old 12-19-2010, 02:58 PM
  # 58 (permalink)  
Member
 
LucyA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,017
On my travels with work, trying to find cheap eating places (because my clients are on benefits and have very little money) I found a place called Taste of Texas, the owner is a lovely lady originally from Texas, I've only met her twice but she remembered me and gave us free drinks!
The first time I went to her cafe she was saying how she hated the snow and had been checking out the weather 'at home' on the 'net.
She made me the best English breakfast I've ever had.
She calls jam jelly, then remembers that we call it jam. Jelly to me is completely different.
LucyA is offline  
Old 12-19-2010, 03:02 PM
  # 59 (permalink)  
Member
 
ZZworldontheweb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 432
People in Maine say "wicked" to mean "very". The people in the tourist industry industry use it a lot!
ZZworldontheweb is offline  
Old 04-11-2016, 07:07 PM
  # 60 (permalink)  
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Newport News, VA
Posts: 2
Smile Thanks for posting this, but I think I have a couple of corrections....

Since SR is a global website, I think it would be interesting to start a thread based upon the regional slang words or phrases that are common in your area. American English has several highly developed and distinct regional varieties. Include the different regional slang words or phrases of our fellow English speaking members could be both very interesting and helpful.

I lived my first 18 years of my life in Iowa, my AH is from Pittsburgh, PA, 7 years around Baltimore, MD, and now I have lived the past 20 years in Texas. So I will post some of the variations that I have come across......



I grew up in Central Iowa until I was 13. There were two words that you listed that I learned slightly differently.

CHUCK (not Chunk) is to throw something or throw something in the trash

Feisty/Ornry/Arnry/Ornery all mean sassy, with an attitude, or the person is enjoying being obstinate or contrary. This is not playing devil's advocate, this person is just trying to play with you.

Frisky means playful and flirty, if you get what I mean

I did not grow up saying "worsh" or "warsh," but ironically, I had a 7th grade English teacher who used them.

Thanks again for the post, and thanks for reading a response from a Newbie.
IrishLass72 is offline  

Currently Active Users Viewing this Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:48 PM.