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losing weight while quitting booze?

Old 05-15-2020, 11:26 AM
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kja
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losing weight while quitting booze?

Hi everyone. I am new here but not so new to the idea of quitting drinking for good. I've tried many times and failed but I still keep trying. The last several years my drinking really ramped up, as did my weight. I have put on about 30 pounds the last few years, especially in my stomach. I really want to work on losing the weight but I am worried that if I do that at the same time I am working on recovery I will feel too deprived and end up failing in both areas. Does anyone have any advice or willing to share their experience? I know my recovery is more important than my pant size, but I am really becoming uncomfortable.
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Old 05-15-2020, 01:21 PM
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Many people find just by quitting drinking that is enough to drop a little weight.

In the beginning I treated myself like I was recovering from a life threatening illness, because I was. I started eating nutritious meals I prepared myself and I started walking every day to help me heal from the alcohol issues.

I'm sure that helped. In the beginning of sobriety I was still eating quite a lot of sweets to cover for all that sugar I had previously consumed in my drinks so I didn't lose weight in the first few months, but I did lose nearly 20 pounds in that first year, putting me at mid-range of my healthy weight BMI.

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Old 05-17-2020, 04:12 PM
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Hi kja, and welcome!

I will tell you of my experience. The first time I stopped drinking I put on weight. This came as a complete shock to me as I had heard many times, including from my own doctor, that by giving up drinking alone, the "pounds will just melt away". In theory, that indeed should be the case - there are a lot of calories in alcohol, not to forget the late night eating and the morning after eating to try and clear the hangover.

But as bb says, the sugar cravings can be quite something. It's certainly something I wish I was aware of that first time around. And indeed I was when I quit January this year, and have lost about 20 pounds in that time. Exercise and keeping the sugar intake in check have been a key part of that this time around.

That said, I wouldn't worry too much about whether you're going to lose or gain weight in the beginning though - recovery is far more important than that.

Final thought for now though - if weight loss is important to you, and I understand that because I'm in the same boat - it's a whole lot easier without the booze than with it.
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Old 06-06-2020, 03:37 PM
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Pay close attention to the HALT thing. Hungry angry lonely tired. You cut back on food in early recovery that Hunger, Anger, Lonely, tired thing can be a real monster. If you’re feeling sorry for yourself or angry because the diet is making you miserable just be sure to sate that appetite with food and not a drink!
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Old 06-25-2020, 02:37 AM
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All and all I think itīs a great idea. Getting a body one is comfortable with can actually help with recovery a great deal and help keeping you motivated. With a balanced diet and physical exercise there will also be a ton of massive benefits to your physical and mental well being. Personally I never understood people who doesnīt start working on their body and health in recovery. Recovery is about improving your life, why would you not work in the most important thing youīll ever have?

That being said, donīt go to any extremes, do it in a healthy way. Extreme diets are very rarely a good idea for addicts, and tend to magnify the cravings for alcohol and drugs tremendously. Keep it simple and start with the basics that everybody knows, but so few practice. Lots of whole grain, keep the refined sugar to a minimum, lots and lots of vegetables, plenty of water and just eat a little less then you used to. Have one day per week where you let yourself go and eat what you like (within reasonable amounts). Find a type of exercise you enjoy (can be anything from simple walking or hiking, to the gym, to hundreds of different sports) and try to do it at least 3 times/week.

Most importantly: focus on building long lasting habits instead of chasing quick results. Thatīs how you get lasting results.
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Old 07-04-2020, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Duckfeathers View Post
All and all I think itīs a great idea. Getting a body one is comfortable with can actually help with recovery a great deal and help keeping you motivated. With a balanced diet and physical exercise there will also be a ton of massive benefits to your physical and mental well being. Personally I never understood people who doesnīt start working on their body and health in recovery. Recovery is about improving your life, why would you not work in the most important thing youīll ever have?

That being said, donīt go to any extremes, do it in a healthy way. Extreme diets are very rarely a good idea for addicts, and tend to magnify the cravings for alcohol and drugs tremendously. Keep it simple and start with the basics that everybody knows, but so few practice. Lots of whole grain, keep the refined sugar to a minimum, lots and lots of vegetables, plenty of water and just eat a little less then you used to. Have one day per week where you let yourself go and eat what you like (within reasonable amounts). Find a type of exercise you enjoy (can be anything from simple walking or hiking, to the gym, to hundreds of different sports) and try to do it at least 3 times/week.

Most importantly: focus on building long lasting habits instead of chasing quick results. Thatīs how you get lasting results.
This is great advice!
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Old 09-18-2020, 01:32 AM
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I've come to find out that while recovering, one needs to take small steps towards developing a healthy lifestyle in which you want to lose weight. Instead of doing away with the unhealthy all at once take it slow. For instance, let's say in sobriety a person eats fast food, drinks a ton of sodas, and smokes. That's a lot to try to displace, especially all at once. What would be a great option would be to first commit to only drinking nothing but water, and do away with sodas. Push yourself to do that for a solid 3-4 months. Once you make it to the 4th month, then commit to smoking less and less each day until you are able to quit. Then tackle the food. This can all be done in any order of course. Hope this finds you well.
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Old 09-18-2020, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by kja View Post
Hi everyone. I am new here but not so new to the idea of quitting drinking for good. I've tried many times and failed but I still keep trying. The last several years my drinking really ramped up, as did my weight. I have put on about 30 pounds the last few years, especially in my stomach. I really want to work on losing the weight but I am worried that if I do that at the same time I am working on recovery I will feel too deprived and end up failing in both areas. Does anyone have any advice or willing to share their experience? I know my recovery is more important than my pant size, but I am really becoming uncomfortable.
It never ceases to amaze me how easy it is for people to talk themselves into or out of things. I was one of those people so I'm hardly excluding myself here.

You can live in your mind or you can act and accomplish just about whatever you put your mind to. In other words - rather than live in your mind, start making your mind work for you. Stop thinking so much and start Doing.

Stop drinking. Lose weight by not eating so much. These things aren't easy to do, but - so what.
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