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Bulimia and alcoholism

Old 02-09-2016, 09:09 PM
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I have just past 30 days sober (again) and I am in a yoga teacher trainer class and just doing yoga wears me out. I am finding it very helpful in my recovery and it is helping me to slowly get my energy back. Alcoholic1000 if you don't mind me asking what are you different cravings? Your post made me try and figure out what my triggers are for both. I know my ED cravings tend to be if I let myself get too hungry and also has to do with control. My alcoholism I am normally looking for motivation to get something done or to help me in social situations. I think I use both to escape reality.
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Old 02-10-2016, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by greeneyed View Post
I think I use both to escape reality.
Greeneyed-

I just want to comment that I use food to alter/escape reality. I think this is one of the themes that I hear regularly in addiction as an underlying factor (regardless of the drug of choice).

For me it was typically to escape the reality of my feelings. How about you?
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Old 02-27-2016, 09:39 AM
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I too, suffer from bulimia and alcoholism. I am also a compulsive gambler and spender. I have been struggling with bulimia for 20 years. 20 frikken years!! and off and on with alcohol for about 15 years. It really became a problem in the last 2 years. If one problem is in check, one of the other rears its huge, angry head.

I am 13 days sober now. I can't get enough of food and exercising. I've dropped 10 lbs since I quit drinking and I'm thrilled with the way my body looks and feels. Although I can't attribute it all to healthy habits.

I always get stuck on, you can say no to the booze and dump it out and stay away from it. But you need to eat to live.
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Old 02-27-2016, 02:43 PM
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Delizadee-

Welcome to this side of things.

Congrats on 13 days sober. What kind of support do you have in place for your recovery?

One piece I struggled with when I started this journey was trying to "fix" it all at once.

Can your sobriety, and the good feelings and hard work that you have been doing to get those pieces in place be enough for right now?

What kind of support do you need going forward.
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by LifeRecovery View Post
Delizadee-

Welcome to this side of things.

Congrats on 13 days sober. What kind of support do you have in place for your recovery?

One piece I struggled with when I started this journey was trying to "fix" it all at once.

Can your sobriety, and the good feelings and hard work that you have been doing to get those pieces in place be enough for right now?

What kind of support do you need going forward.
Hi LifeRecovery, and thanks!

The sobriety is really going well for me. I really leaned heavily on SR when I first quit and read a ton of great stuff on here. I made myself a recovery plan and right now I am making use of all the tools I possibly can to cement this lifestyle change into my life. I attend AA meetings as often as I can, I have a sponsor, and next week I meet with my new addictions counsellor to work on continuing to move forward in sobriety. I am taking it day by day and not attempting to fix everything all at once. Although, the self-work I am doing through AA and the steps, as well as a sober app I have, is really helping in all areas of my life. Given time I will continue on with my other afflictions, and work with a psychiatrist and therapist to deal with the eating disorder is in the works for the future.

I've never really felt hopeful about shaking my ED with any sort of finality. I struggled for years with alcohol, but finally getting to the point where it is now a no-go for me and taking the steps necessary to fix the issue, I feel more hopeful towards letting go of this other monkey on my back.

Thanks for the kind words and support.
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:57 AM
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D-

They say that 30% of people that struggle with food also struggle with a substance. I have been to enough open AA meetings to know that if you struggle with a substance you may struggle with food too.

I have also learned that anything that is working on my recovery in the long run helps with all of them, but during times of stress and change some behaviors may be up more than others.

Keep putting one foot in front of the other. It will come and can happen.
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Old 09-20-2016, 10:13 AM
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Yes.

Recovered from alcoholism 8+ years.
Recovered from bulimia 7+ years.

I focused on alcoholism first. Did AA and the steps - the obsession to drink was gone within a few months. Kept working on my program and spirituality and honesty. One day in Feb, I just decided I was done with binges and purges. Never looked back. It became like booze - I just recoiled from the idea of it.

I did develop another eating disorder several months after stopping the bulimia - I became addicted to exercise. It started off innocently enough and escalated. I've been in recovery from that for 4+ years.

It's difficult to find a middle ground with eating disorders. I am still not there, but I'm 100 times more healthy today than I was when I first got started, so don't give up. It takes work, but if you're willing to put in the effort, recovery is definitely possible.
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Old 09-20-2016, 04:14 PM
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Pagekeeper-

My ED behavior jumped around in "type," for a long time and included over exercising for a long time too.

I ended up not exercising for quite some time (years) except walking my dogs.

In the last month a number of things have come together for me, but especially good overall self-care which includes activity/exercise of a more reasonable amount. I who have always struggled around balance with food and activity seem to have found a semblance of it.

It took time, but it did happen. It will for you to, just keep having faith in yourself.
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Old 12-29-2016, 06:45 AM
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Try18,
I got sober at 29, became bulimic at 30. Overeating is my first love (first memory of bingeing is at age 7). It took me some time but became abstinent from bulimic Jan 1, 2002. Didn't get overall food abstinent until Nov 28, 2005. Recovery is possible; it takes work though. I felt like a fraud going to AA meetings knowing I had a fall back (food) when times got tough. After a food binge, I'd recover from it, get cleaned up and go to an AA meeting like everything's fine. Today I work both AA and OA. Over the years there's been times that AA has taken center stage. Presently I am more active in OA but still attend meetings in both fellowships. Please don't give up. I did one addiction at a time; if I could do it (with HP's help), you can too.
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Old 01-06-2017, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by LifeRecovery View Post
Trying18-

I have been in recovery from my eating disorder for the last 13 years. It is not perfect, but it is much better.

There is data showing that at least 30% of people with eating disorders struggle with another addiction also. I don't say that to scare you, but to normalize this experience.

I could not do it alone. My therapist is versed in both eating disorders and addictions.

Having someone like that in my life has made all the difference.
Thank you so much for posting this LR - it was like a light switching on when I read it. I never considered my ED an addiction, but of course it is.

I struggled with bulimia from age 13-21, which is roughly when my drinking started (I'm now 33). I then got into my first serious relationship, and basically had to make a decision between the ED or the boy, there wasn't enough room for both. Thankfully, I chose the boy, and even though we're no longer together (I'm married to the love of my life), I am very grateful to him for that. He had no idea I was bulimic, but having someone around so much - and someone that I was absolutely crazy about - made it next to impossible!

I still have a weird relationship with food. Recently, (as my drinking increased), I would describe it as, "bulimia without the yuck bit!" Basically, I have the same compulsions, but can't throw up (I've actually tried a couple of times and can't physically seem to do it anymore - probably a blessing). So, it has shifted to compulsive eating really. I've put on so much weight since I started drinking again.

I've been sober for a week now, and looking forward to tackling my attitude towards eating as well. I would just love to eat sensibly/healthily, and not worry about it anymore.
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Old 01-07-2017, 08:47 AM
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Welcome to Ringo and Brick to this side of the forum.

I have not had to fight the sobriety battle, but I have struggled with food most of my life, and part of my food struggle was co-dependency driven.

As I was working on my recovery from food stuff I met, loved and married a problem drinker.

Regardless of what tools I learned or what the focus was any recovery helped my recovery from all of my challenges.

Ringo it sounds like 12 step work has helped you. Brick what about you what kind of support do you have in place for yourself regarding your recovery?
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Old 01-07-2017, 11:35 AM
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Thanks LR! I'm on my eighth sober day today, and relying on the forum at the moment. Tentatively considering going to an AA meeting - I'll see how I feel.

I've got a pretty good handle on the eating side now, but have just started the WW online programme to encourage me to eat a little healthier. Feeling much better already!
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:49 AM
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Brick,
I highly recommend going to an AA meeting. Maybe by now you've checked one out.

No way could I have stayed sober w/o regular attendance at meetings and of course, working the Steps.

You are worth whatever work and effort it takes for you to recover.
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Old 06-17-2020, 03:33 AM
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Iím new to this site and came across alcohol and bulimia. Fits me almost perfectly. Iíve struggled with bulimia since about 15 and I guess now looking back probably alcohol as well. In the last couple of years I discovered cocaine and adderall. These both helped control my appetite and urge to binge and purge. I hadnít gone a day in probably ten years without b/p until I started using adderall. Iím about 24 days alcohol free but still taking an excessive amount of adderall on a daily basis. It makes me feel like a normal person. Iím not obsessed with food. I noticed since I stopped drinking that Iíve gained weight! How is that even possible? I would say Iím average weight. I even started exercising and am eating healthy. Ugh. Anyone else out there have a similar story?!
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Old 06-17-2020, 03:37 AM
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Just wanted to welcome you Ilovelucy91
You'll find a lot of support and understanding here.

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Old 06-22-2020, 01:25 PM
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Ilovelucy-

Welcome to this side of the recovery.

What kind of support are you getting in place for your recovery?

It is very common that people struggle with more than one type of addiction. They say at least a third of people with eating challenges also have substance challenges too? I have been fortunate enough to attend a number of open AA meetings (especially female only meetings) and have witnessed first hand how challenging food can be for people who come together for a substance abuse. For me when I remember that food has been a part of my life from day one it helps to realize all the "connections," both healthy and not that I have made over the years.

For me only working on my recovery, in any area of my life has helped my recovery in all areas of my life. It does not always seem that way at the time but it does trickle over into better self care for me.

How are you doing today?
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