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Old 02-21-2019, 03:14 AM   #1 (permalink)
MDF
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Rational Recovery the New Cure for Substance Addiction


Hello everyone, I had a friend recommended to me the Rational Recovery book so I ordered it on eBay. My question is, has anyone here read it? Is it interesting?
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:35 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I quit drinking in the 90s, and heard about rational recovery back then, but the closest meetings were over 100 miles away. I never read the book, but from the reviews at Amazon and the description at Wikipedia, it sounds much like a program I cobbled together on my own. I am convinced that each of us is totally responsible for our own alcoholism and our own recovery, and I believe that those who succeed take this responsibility even if they aren't aware they are doing it.

I'm guessing the author's philosophy probably mirrors my own approach. I would be interested in reading it just to take notes on points of agreement and disagreement. I may order it myself, although not as an attempt at self help, but more out of curiosity. Fighting my addiction to alcohol is no longer part of my life, but I'm still interested in the issue.

Wiki says Rational Recovery reported officially closing it's meetings forever in 1999 on the grounds that "meetings were unnecessary." Of the controversial tenets of RR critiqued by others, this is the one I would question most. Meetings seemed very necessary in my recovery, although if I were as advanced in logic as StarTrek's Mr. Spock, I think a case could be made for eliminating meetings, at least for such a small niche group. But even for die hard skeptics, such isolation is not in big demand, in my opinion.

MDF, are you interested in the book because you are looking for a program that takes a more logical approach to alcoholism, or are you just curious about other alternatives? Basically, do you still need help with addiction? I haven't been around long enough to keep track of everyone in the forum.
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Old 02-21-2019, 08:34 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Rational Recovery is the recovery system that has produced much that is spoken of in recovery circles. Addictive Voice Recognition Technique, The Beast aspect of our brain, and more.

A great 'crash course' can be done by doing a web search for 'Crash Course on AVRT'. I highly recommend it.

For me, after going thru rehab, then drinking/using again, and making the 'Big Plan' commitment numerous times, it still ended up with me relying on that guy, 'Will Power'. I struggled for a long time (face in the pavement struggling) ... and that guy always let me down. Maybe I'm just in the 'leper' class of alcoholics, or maybe I could never force myself to stick with the Big Plan commitment, but ultimately I needed the AA program (that is what ultimately worked for me).

However, the concepts of Rational Recovery, recognition of that Addictive Voice in me and the concept of the Beast Brain in me driving my sub-conscious behavior... are still valuable tools for me in my ongoing sobriety.

RDBplus3 ... Happy, Joyous and FREE ... and I Know U Can B 2
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Old 02-21-2019, 08:49 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I quit drinking in the 90s, and heard about rational recovery back then, but the closest meetings were over 100 miles away. I never read the book, but from the reviews at Amazon and the description at Wikipedia, it sounds much like a program I cobbled together on my own. I am convinced that each of us is totally responsible for our own alcoholism and our own recovery, and I believe that those who succeed take this responsibility even if they aren't aware they are doing it.

I'm guessing the author's philosophy probably mirrors my own approach. I would be interested in reading it just to take notes on points of agreement and disagreement. I may order it myself, although not as an attempt at self help, but more out of curiosity. Fighting my addiction to alcohol is no longer part of my life, but I'm still interested in the issue.

Wiki says Rational Recovery reported officially closing it's meetings forever in 1999 on the grounds that "meetings were unnecessary." Of the controversial tenets of RR critiqued by others, this is the one I would question most. Meetings seemed very necessary in my recovery, although if I were as advanced in logic as StarTrek's Mr. Spock, I think a case could be made for eliminating meetings, at least for such a small niche group. But even for die hard skeptics, such isolation is not in big demand, in my opinion.

MDF, are you interested in the book because you are looking for a program that takes a more logical approach to alcoholism, or are you just curious about other alternatives? Basically, do you still need help with addiction? I haven't been around long enough to keep track of everyone in the forum.
Actually I consider my approach to recovery eclectic, I'm really just curious about the book and its approach to recovery. I don't have an urge to drink anymore to be honest and have been around relatives while they're drinking and it doesn't bother me.
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Old 02-21-2019, 08:51 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by RDBplus3 View Post
Rational Recovery is the recovery system that has produced much that is spoken of in recovery circles. Addictive Voice Recognition Technique, The Beast aspect of our brain, and more.

A great 'crash course' can be done by doing a web search for 'Crash Course on AVRT'. I highly recommend it.

For me, after going thru rehab, then drinking/using again, and making the 'Big Plan' commitment numerous times, it still ended up with me relying on that guy, 'Will Power'. I struggled for a long time (face in the pavement struggling) ... and that guy always let me down. Maybe I'm just in the 'leper' class of alcoholics, or maybe I could never force myself to stick with the Big Plan commitment, but ultimately I needed the AA program (that is what ultimately worked for me).

However, the concepts of Rational Recovery, recognition of that Addictive Voice in me and the concept of the Beast Brain in me driving my sub-conscious behavior... are still valuable tools for me in my ongoing sobriety.

RDBplus3 ... Happy, Joyous and FREE ... and I Know U Can B 2
Thanks for the information and glad to hear about your sobriety! I am currently working the 4th step but really I just mainly go to AA meetings to hear speakers and people's stories of recovery.
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Old 02-21-2019, 09:20 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Actually I consider my approach to recovery eclectic, I'm really just curious about the book and its approach to recovery. I don't have an urge to drink anymore to be honest and have been around relatives while they're drinking and it doesn't bother me.
The same for me. I also consider myself an eclectic. I used AA for face to face contact with other alcoholics, but utilized knowledge about addiction and techniques that were mostly my own in recovery.

Rational Recovery's alcoholic voice was something I recognized in myself before I ever heard the term. I see the AV as a metaphor for resistance to the truth. I don't hear from my belligerent AV anymore. It has been replaced by my more constructive SV (sober voice), which was always there, even when I was drinking, but for some reason was always taking a back seat to my AV during my time of struggle. Even today, my "sober voice" is still mostly quiet because it has no particular beef with my current behavior. I actually don't want to be bothered by voices in my head. I enjoy the peace and quiet from the absence of internal conflict of the warring voices.
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Old 07-28-2019, 04:02 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Rational Recovery - The New Cure is talked about a lot here on SR in the Secular Connections and Permanent Abstinence sub forums!

That book saved my life and there are lots of great threads about it. In my opinion it is the most inclusive, most effective, method to quit, and quit for life.

When I first quit I liked it because it required no faith to utilize. Today I like it for it's mystical aspects of taking control of those lower chakras. The higher self rules the lower. We don't allow ourselves to be ruled by our animal desires.
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