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'Drinkers Like Me' BBC documentary

Old 09-22-2018, 04:23 AM
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'Drinkers Like Me' BBC documentary

I looked for a thread on this but couldn't find one. It was on the BBC about a month ago. It was Adrian Chiles, a TV presenter and journalist from the UK, examining his drinking.

He said he knows he drinks far too much but that he isn't an alcoholic and doesn't do anything bad or embarrassing when he drinks. However, the further we got into the documentary we really saw how Adrian relied on alcohol as a crutch and how his whole social life revolves around booze.

The mental gymnastics I saw on that show was like a blast from the past. I had personally used every single one. It was fascinating to watch, but also scary. I don't want to spoil the ending for anyone but I will say it left me feeling a little bit hollow. And incredibly grateful I have cut it out completely.

Thoughts?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RX2opvj7WE8&t=2897s
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Old 09-22-2018, 05:26 AM
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I watched this a couple of weeks ago and in my opinion, it seems to be a pretty standard view about the drinking culture in the UK. Everything on a social level seems to revolve around drinking. Most people here seem to be relatively ignorant as to the amount their drinking and the long term dangers of the stuff.
I personally didn't think I had a problem because everyone else seemed to be drinking an equal or greater amount than I was.
I think they should make a documentary about how you can be happy without it and sober doesn't equate to never having a social life or being termed boring.
That said, I do think he was very honest about himself and I did find it worth watching.
It is still on the BBC IPLAYER for 11 more days under documentaries.
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:07 AM
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I didn't watch the entire thing, but I did catch something interesting at the very end, "I absolutely pledge never to allow myself to be pressured into drinking something I don't want to drink". Sounds like something I might have said when I was a drinker, with absolutely zero impact on anything because of course when I drank, it was always because I wanted to.
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Old 09-23-2018, 02:44 AM
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Obviously,from what you've said...

Whilst I to didn't watch the documentary, obviously from your description he's never heard the term,'high functioning alcoholic' which,in my drinking days.Now, thankfully, long since passed, perfectly described me...it wasn't really until I was in my mid 50's that I actually physically felt 'the cravings' although in truth, I think mentally they'd been there long before that!

And woke up, recognised and accepted that I couldn't stop drinking and that in truth, like it or not, no matter what others thought of me, I was an alcoholic albeit a high functioning one...along with the fact that as the aging factor kicks in. It only gets worse, it never gets better..;.

Thank you for reminding me about myself.
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Old 09-23-2018, 02:51 AM
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Addendum...

I always work on the basis that I would rather go through life sober believing I'm an alcoholic. Than go through it drunk trying to convince myself I'm not.

A thought that works for me and many others...
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Old 09-23-2018, 04:12 AM
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Sky,

That BBC guy is in denial or missing the brain damage part of addiction. Fairly typical.

I was watching a comic on tv last night and he reminded me that drugs, booze included, are like vacations for poor people.

The problem is folks like me decided to stay on this vacation, 24/7. This kills us faster than normal.

Folks that drink moderately, once or twice a year...like a typical vacation, don't have a problem and make it to a demise not altered by drinking.

The 10%, like me, have to find other ways to vacation 24/7. That is what us addicts have to manage.

Some folks are taught, or otherwise learn, to not drink at all. Others, like me, learn that drinking is part of life. I got arrested at 17 for drinking. I almost ruined my life that young. Lucky is the only way to explain how I made it this far.

Stay clean.

Thanks.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:00 AM
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I watched the documentary when it was on a few weeks ago. Oh my goodness, the denial. I so related to what Adrian was saying.

I watched as I have always rather liked him, had no idea he drank.

He used to be on telly and radio a lot but I had noticed him gradually disappearing.

His denial and rationalising seemed to me to be very typical of a problem drinker. I have used the same words in the past to minimise my drinking.

The most telling thing he said, imo, was about how he arranged his life around his drinking. I did that too. To me a sure sign that alcohol is in charge.

Good luck to him.
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Old 09-23-2018, 01:10 PM
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I just watched it, and I also felt there was a lot of denial among the people he spoke to (who were still drinking) and in him.
One man said, “I know my limits.”
What he didn’t say was “ And I regularly exceed them.”
There was also a bit of stuff from people about how they don’t drink in the morning so they are not addicted.
I appreciated the honesty of the couple of people in group who recognized that, while others are able to moderate, they cannot, and so are abstinent.
Having been to the UK several times, I will say that there what seems like a gazillion pubs there, so I can see how drinking and a social life are intertwined.
Very interesting.
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Old 09-23-2018, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Maudcat View Post
I just watched it, and I also felt there was a lot of denial among the people he spoke to (who were still drinking) and in him.
One man said, “I know my limits.”
What he didn’t say was “ And I regularly exceed them.”
There was also a bit of stuff from people about how they don’t drink in the morning so they are not addicted.
I appreciated the honesty of the couple of people in group who recognized that, while others are able to moderate, they cannot, and so are abstinent.
Having been to the UK several times, I will say that there what seems like a gazillion pubs there, so I can see how drinking and a social life are intertwined.
Very interesting.
'My limit' used to be around two bottles of red wine and a few pints a day. My GP actually gasped when I told her that. To me that was normal.

My favourite line was from the guy who gulped down that ridiculously strong G&T in the garden and said "we are addicted to alcohol without being alcoholics" Er...right.

People are terrified of the word 'alcoholic'. And terrified of losing their crutch. I can't help but feel Adrian can't moderate forever. He will be back on 100+ units a week. We all know about kindling.

I understand his struggle though. I was like that for a good five years before I finally ripped the band aid off and said no more madness.
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Old 09-24-2018, 08:29 AM
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FWIW, my opinion only:
I am not fond of the word, “alcoholic.”
When I attended AA, I really disliked introducing myself and self defining as an alcoholic.
I prefer to say “person in recovery.”
I know. Kinda woo woo, but it works for me.
I found it interesting that the only person in the video who used “alcohol dependent,” the more current descriptor of someone who overdrinks, was the physician.
Everyone else used “alcoholic.”
I don’t really have a point here, just observing.
Ant any rate, it was an interesting video to watch, and I appreciate that it was posted here.
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Old 09-24-2018, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Maudcat View Post
FWIW, my opinion only:
I am not fond of the word, “alcoholic.”
When I attended AA, I really disliked introducing myself and self defining as an alcoholic.
I prefer to say “person in recovery.”
I know. Kinda woo woo, but it works for me.
I found it interesting that the only person in the video who used “alcohol dependent,” the more current descriptor of someone who overdrinks, was the physician.
Everyone else used “alcoholic.”
I don’t really have a point here, just observing.
Ant any rate, it was an interesting video to watch, and I appreciate that it was posted here.
Apparently doctors are reluctant to use the word 'alcoholic' because there are so, so many shades of grey with addiction.

Someone could go all week without a drink then get blackout drunk on Friday and Saturday night with their mates. Or have a bottle of wine every night. Or they need a drink first thing in the morning then keep a 'buzzed' level all day. Or they rarely drink but once they have one they can't stop until they are blackout drunk.

It is hard to diagnose someone as a 'problem drinker', which is the term most people use nowadays. I personally prefer to use the word 'alcoholic' because that means I am not kidding myself. It works for me, but I respect that for some people it may not.

Whatever keeps us sober

I have a ton of respect for Adrian for doing this documentary. He was so honest and he really tried hard to understand why he drank. It got a lot of people talking about their drinking and considering their habits. Which is a very good thing
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Old 09-26-2018, 04:05 PM
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I just think the term alcoholic is so freighted with expectations and assumptions.
It’s also a bit dated, as the medical term now is alcohol use disorder and people are alcohol dependent or alcohol addicted.
It’s just me. It doesn’t really matter how we define ourselves as long as we are honest about things.
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