Go Back   SoberRecovery : Alcoholism Drug Addiction Help and Information > Friends and Family > Friends and Family of Alcoholics
Forgot Password? Join Us!
Register Blogs FAQ Calendar Arcade Mark Forums Read Chat Room


Welcome to the Sober Recovery Community

Already registered? Login above ---^
OR
To take advantage of all Posting, Chatting, Gaming, and all the features available at SoberRecovery, join the over 100,000 current members, and become a member of our supportive community today! Ads will no longer appear on the forums, once you register.



Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-10-2009, 01:06 AM   #1 (permalink)
Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bristol TN/VA
Posts: 12,242
Blog Entries: 5
Alcohol abuse and abusive men

The following represents the relationship between abusive men and alcohol abuse:

Alcohol abuse in men increases the chance of partner abuse eightfold. It also doubles the risk that they will kill or attempt to kill their female partners.
Among men who batter their partners and who abuse drugs, a third of the violence happens when the men are sober.
Being physically abused as a child is a risk factor for substance abuse as an adult.
Alcohol or drug abuse remains a major risk factor for men who become violent.
Men who have been a victim of violence or who have seen violence in the home may imitate the violence they have seen or experienced.
Men who tend to resort to violence when they are frustrated or angry may not have learned the nonviolent ways of expressing these emotions.
Approximately 46% of men who commit acts of violence with their partners also have substance abuse problems.
Not all men who are dependent on drugs or alcohol resort to violence. In a similar manner, not all violent men abuse drugs or alcohol.
Men living with women who have alcohol abuse problems often try to justify their violence as a way to control their female partners when they are drunk
__________________
Each small candle lights a corner of the dark....Roger Waters

Live is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 01:34 AM   #2 (permalink)
Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bristol TN/VA
Posts: 12,242
Blog Entries: 5
Domestic Violence & Alcohol and Other Drugs

"Alcohol is associated with a substantial proportion of human violence, and perpetrators are often under the influence of alcohol. " Eighth Special Report to the U.S. Congress on Alcohol and Health (Secretary of Health and Human Services, September 1993)

Studies of domestic violence frequently document high rates of alcohol and other drug (AOD) involvement, and AOD use is known to impair judgment, reduce inhibition, and increase aggression. Alcoholism and child abuse, including incest, seem tightly intertwined as well. The connection between child abuse and alcohol abuse "may take the form of alcohol abuse in parents or alcohol intoxication at the time of the abuse incident."[1] Not only do abusers tend to be heavy drinkers, but those who have been abused stand a higher probability of abusing alcohol and other drugs over the course of their lifetime.

Alcohol consistently "emerges as a significant predictor of marital violence."[2] Alcoholic women have been found to be significantly more likely to have experienced negative verbal conflict with spouses than were nonalcoholic women. They were also significantly more likely to have experienced a range of moderate and severe physical violence.

Studies have shown a significant association between battering incidents and alcohol abuse. Further, a dual problem with alcohol and other drugs is even more likely to be associated with the more severe battering incidents than is alcohol abuse by itself. The need for preventing alcohol and other drug problems is clear when examining the following statistics are examined:

In 1987, 64 percent of all reported child abuse and neglect cases in New York City were associated with parental AOD abuse.[3]
A study of 472 women by the Research Institute on Addictions in Buffalo, NY, found that 87 percent of alcoholic women had been physically or sexually abused as children, compared to 59 percent of the nonalcoholic women surveyed (Miller and Downs, 1993).[4]
A 1993 study of more than 2,000 American couples found rates of domestic violence were almost 15 times higher in households where husbands were described as often drunk as opposed to never drunk.[5]
Battered women are at increased risk of attempting suicide, abusing alcohol and other drugs, depression, and abusing their own children.[6]
Alcohol is present in more than 50 percent of all incidents of domestic violence.[5]
While alcohol and other drug use is neither an excuse for nor a direct cause of family violence, several theories might explain the relationship. For example, women who are abused often live with men who drink heavily, which places the women in an environment where their potential exposure to violence is higher.

A second possible explanation is that women using alcohol and other drugs may not recognize assault cues and even if they do, may not know how to respond appropriately. Third, alcohol and other drug abuse by either parent could contribute to family violence by exacerbating financial problems, child-care difficulties, or other family stressers. Finally, the experience of being a victim of parental abuse could contribute to future alcohol and other drug abuse.

To reduce the incidence of these problems in the future, prevention of alcohol and other drug abuse must be a top priority. For more information, call the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information at 1-800-729-6686.

All statistics cited in this Making the Link fact sheet come from the following sources:

1.Widom, Cathy Spatz. "Child Abuse and Alcohol Use." Research Monograph 24: Alcohol and Interpersonal Violence: Fostering Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 1993.

2.Kantor, Glenda Kaufman. "Refining the Brushstrokes in Portraits of Alcohol and Wife Assaults." Research Monograph 24: Alcohol and Interpersonal Violence: Fostering Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 1993.

3.Chasnoff, I.J. Drugs, Alcohol, Pregnancy and Parenting, Northwestern University Medical School, Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Hingham, MA, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988.

4.Miller, Brenda A. and Downs, William R. "The Impact of Family Violence on the Use of Alcohol by Women," Alcohol Health and Research World, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 137-143, 1993.

5.Collins, J.J., and Messerschmidt, M.A. Epidemiology of Alcohol-Related Violence. Alcohol Health and Reasearch World, 17(2):93-100. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 1993.

6.Fact Sheet on Physical and Sexual Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, April 1994.

Spring 1995 NCADI Inventory Number ML001
__________________
Each small candle lights a corner of the dark....Roger Waters

Live is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 01:38 AM   #3 (permalink)
Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bristol TN/VA
Posts: 12,242
Blog Entries: 5
Alcohol, Drugs and Domestic Violence:
What’s The Connection?


Dale Kay Lillak, M.S.

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist



Dr. David Smith, speaking at the annual conference of Physicians For A Violence Free Society (February 1997) estimates that 50% of all domestic violence which ends in death correlates with alcohol and/or drug use at the time of the assault, with alcohol and methamphetamines being the primary drugs of abuse. Dr. Smith, who is President of the Haight Ashbury Clinic, went on to say that 95% of these murder victims are women.

Domestic violence and substance abuse seem to go hand in hand, but does substance abuse cause domestic violence? This is a question many law enforcement officers would affirm as true. Yet, we all know that thousands of people drink and use illegal substances daily and never commit acts of violence to a stranger and most especially to their "loved one". If a direct-cause or one-to-one relationship between domestic violence and substance abuse does not exist, how are these two very distinct and different problems correlated?

Theories and implications . . .

Disinhibition: The disinhibition theory suggests that the physiological and psychological changes which occur while under the influence explain the high incidence of violence. Errors in thinking occur, such as, impairment in choice making or misinterpreting others’ intent and behavior. Perception and time distortion couple to create an over reaction to current events rather than assessing future consequences. This concept implies that domestic violence is a direct outcome of the disinhibiting effects of alcohol or other drugs. It is important to recognize, however, that domestic violence is selective violence. That is, people who perpetrate domestic violence do not usually become violent with other people, such as, their co-workers, boss, or friends. Disinhibition alone is not a primary cause of domestic violence.

Attribution: Our cultural beliefs or attitudes about drunkenness color our ideas about behavior. Because we have learned to expect certain behaviors when someone is under-the-influence of alcohol or other drugs, we allow for, tolerate and anticipate misbehavior on the part of the substance abuser. Research in other countries and cultures reveals that expectations about under-the-influence behavior is quite different than ours resulting in different behavior. The attributing of behaviors theory implies that the connection between substance abuse and domestic violence is fallacious. A common misconception in the treatment of substance abuse is that domestic violence will end when the perpetrator stops using and abusing.

Disavowal: Associated with the idea of socially learned attribution of behaviors, disavowal of responsibility allows alcohol and drug use to become an excuse. The perpetrator and those around him tend to blame the drug and the drug using behavior for the violence.



Interaction Model: The interaction of other life events, such as, job pressure or relationship conflict and issues, such as, anger management or poor impulse control are targeted as the underlying problem. The concern becomes one of prioritizing treatment focus toward the substance abuse and the "underlying problem", but not the violence. The interaction model is deceptively close to the mark, and leads treatment providers on a pursuit for the "fix". Again, the violence becomes a "symptom" rather than the problem.

Alcohol and power . . .

Research into understanding domestic violence and the correlation with substance abuse does reveal another way to view this problem. Sociocultural in origin this view arises from our beliefs about violence, intimate relationships, and alcohol. Studies have shown that men who perpetrate domestic violence have rigid (often stereotyped) beliefs about their roles as men. These beliefs were most likely developed in a childhood of violence and dysfunction, and supported by cultural attitudes. The most common factor or set of factors connecting domestic violence and substance abuse are the perpetrator’s beliefs and attitudes about control and power in intimate relationships. Personal power is a highly motivating force within all humans, and unfortunately one of our cultural routes to manhood has been the initiation through alcohol of "feeling like a man" or feeling powerful. According to researchers Lemle and Mishkind (1989) publishing in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, ". . . alcohol provides a semblance of power for fragile masculinity. With all its ambiguities, heavy drinking represents toughness, risk-taking, virility, and sexual prowess in American culture: A man who can hold his liquor is a ‘man’." Dutton and Strachan (1987) comparing men who have assaulted their wives and heavy male drinkers, found that both these groups are distinguished by their need for power. The cause of domestic violence does not reside in the perpetrators use of alcohol or drugs. Domestic violence occurs when the perpetrator holds certain beliefs and attitudes about himself and his world.

The connection . . .

In conclusion, the correlation between substance abuse and domestic violence occurs at several levels: cultural attitudes regarding power in relationships, the abuse of alcohol or other drugs coupled with a distorted sense of masculinity and need for power, and the beliefs of the individual perpetrator regarding the use of violence to control their intimate partner all come together to create this deadly connection.

A cautionary note . . .

Domestic violence is not caused by the use or abuse of alcohol, methamphetamines, cocaine, or any mood altering substance. These problems do occur separate from one another. The severity of violence tends to escalate when people are under-the-influence. The substance abuser is not always the perpetrator. Women with substance abuse problems are frequent targets in relationship violence. The findings discussed in this article do not necessarily translate to an understanding of gay or Lesbian relationship violence. And, finally, female victims of domestic violence report that their use of substances was often a coping strategy, a way to numb the pain of emotional and physical violence.

Bibliography

Dutton, D. & Strachan, C. (1987). Motivational needs for power and spouse-specific assertiveness in assaultive and nonassaultive men. Violence and Victims, 2, 145-156.

Gondolf, E.W. (1993). Alcohol abuse, wife assault, and power needs. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 38-53.

Lemle, R. & Mishkind, M. (1989). Alcohol and masculinity. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 6, 213-322.

Smith, D. (1997). Presentation at The Annual Conference For Physicians For a Violence Free Society, San Francisco.
__________________
Each small candle lights a corner of the dark....Roger Waters

Live is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 04:20 AM   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
Taking5's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: LA - Lower Alabama
Posts: 4,998
Quote:
Domestic violence and substance abuse seem to go hand in hand, but does substance abuse cause domestic violence? This is a question many law enforcement officers would affirm as true.
While houses where there is no domestic abuse will by definition not have cops come there for that reason, it goes without saying that substance abuse still occurs at some of these houses.

However when law enforcement is called for domestic abuse there is almost always substance abuse, estimated at 80% or more from my sources.

I cannot cite studies or other evidence as livewyered did (excellent job BTW), I can cite 2 close friends who are cops, and 1 cop who is in my AA home group. You'll never convince them that these problems are not linked.
__________________
It is easier to practice total abstinence than perfect moderation
_______________________________________
Any quotes from the big book of AA are from the first edition, or are otherwise exempt from copyright infringement under the "fair use doctrine".
Taking5 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 09:59 AM   #5 (permalink)
Community Greeter
 
Freedom1990's Avatar
 

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 10,049
Thank you for posting all of that, Live! :ghug2
__________________
DeVon & the Zoo Crew



‎An error doesn't become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.
--Orlando A. Battista


Freedom1990 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 10:34 AM   #6 (permalink)
Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bristol TN/VA
Posts: 12,242
Blog Entries: 5
You are welcome.

What stands out to me is in the very first line. And so, here is what is says to me:

1 out of every 4, or 1 out of every 3 women will be abused in a relationship.
If there is alcohol involved, that raises those statistics that it will be you, if you are with an alcoholic 8X and are 2X as likely to be killed or attempted murder. YES,MURDER will take place.

Then, that isn't the whole risk. Do you ride in the car with the alcoholic? Do you REALLY know how much he/she has consumed and what?

In my case, I SO did not understand this.

I, thankfully, am still alive, tho' at one point it was THAT dangerous, very suddenly.

I now consider these situations a death wish. UGH
__________________
Each small candle lights a corner of the dark....Roger Waters

Live is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 10:49 AM   #7 (permalink)
Member
 
MissFixit's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 2,305
Hey,

Thank you for posting this. These relationships are crazy aren't they? Very unfortunate. I remember thinking how on earth would anyone get into an abusive relationship. For years I thought how smart and strong I was to avoid them...until mine was over and I looked back and thought, OMG, I was in one.

I wish that addiction was addressed to kids more than it is and abuse was dealt with more severely by the court system. I wonder how "we" as society could better educate and prevent this stuff?
MissFixit is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 12:54 PM   #8 (permalink)
Member
 
Linkmeister's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Somewhere in the big ole' world....
Posts: 545
While I never suffered actual physical abuse, the verbal abuse at the hand of ABF was frightening as when he was drinking, he could switch at the drop of the hat from relatively rational to a tyrant, heaping abuse on me non stop.

Both forms of abuse are horrendous, each with its own set of consequences and when for the final time, I saw that the verbal had a good chance of turning into the physical-when in a drunken tirade (after I had told him it was over and he must leave ASAP) he threatened me and my dog, that was my line in the sand. That night was horrendous - police were involved - and it's still pretty fresh in my mind and will be for a long time to come.

Thank you so much for posting this, to educate me more on this topic and to remind me that abuse and substance abuse are pretty close in nature and deed.
Linkmeister is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 06:23 PM   #9 (permalink)
Being Silent so I can Hear
 
Still Waters's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 2,521
I've asked law enforcement friends to give me a guestimate of alcohol or drug related issues they deal with, it's usually between 90 and 95% of the TOTAL. That's astounding.
Still Waters is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 05:21 AM   #10 (permalink)
Formerly known as soconfused11
 
sodetermined's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Colon, MI
Posts: 410
My X had all the different types of abuse..the physical never reached a serious point (he went to jail several times, took the classes, and learned to walk away when he was getting to that point).

When he was drinking, there was lots of verbal (lots of awful name calling, saying MEAN awful things)....but what was worst of all to me, was the daily, all day long, emotional abuse, and also I just found out from my therapist that sarcasm is a form of abuse. He would do this a lot, and say "I was only joking, but I forgot I can't joke around with you". There were days that he would do or say things that were so subtle that they were even hard to describe to somebody...like flipping through the channels and then stopping on something like "Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders" and he KNEW it bothered me. Stuff like that about drives you crazy.
__________________
I will stand back up,
You'll know just the moment when I've have enough,
Sometimes I'm afraid, and I don't feel that tough,
But I'll stand back up.
sodetermined is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 05:58 AM   #11 (permalink)
Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 39
My ex was 5 yrs clean & sober when I met him. He was attending meetings on a regular basis, even going to Alonon meetings every week. I really thought this man had it together. Then within a year he turned into a monster, blamed me for the abuse.....which being newly sober I thought it was me!! Until I talked to his ex who was with him when he used and discovered not much had really changed with him. He is a sick man with or without the drugs and booze....however should he start using again I think I will go in hiding...lol.
Gemmie is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 06:07 AM   #12 (permalink)
Being Silent so I can Hear
 
Still Waters's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 2,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by sodetermined View Post
My X had all the different types of abuse..the physical never reached a serious point (he went to jail several times, took the classes, and learned to walk away when he was getting to that point).

When he was drinking, there was lots of verbal (lots of awful name calling, saying MEAN awful things)....but what was worst of all to me, was the daily, all day long, emotional abuse, and also I just found out from my therapist that sarcasm is a form of abuse. He would do this a lot, and say "I was only joking, but I forgot I can't joke around with you". There were days that he would do or say things that were so subtle that they were even hard to describe to somebody...like flipping through the channels and then stopping on something like "Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders" and he KNEW it bothered me. Stuff like that about drives you crazy.
Oh yes, I know all about that.

Our best bet is to stay as far away from people like this as possible.
Still Waters is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing this Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:45 AM.


 
National Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers
 
Drug Rehab | Best Treatment Center | Detox Center | Residential Treatment Center
Cocaine/Crack Treatment | Alcohol Rehab | Heroin/Oxycontin Treatment Center | Crystal Meth Treatment | Marijuana Treatment | Methadone Treatment | Suboxone Treatment
 
Local Treatment Resources and Events
 
Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | DC | Delaware
Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine
Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire
New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island
South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennesee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming

© 2013 Internet Brands. | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Health Disclaimer
A proud member of the SoberRecovery® Network of Addiction and Recovery Websites