Access to Recovery

President Bush today announced $100 million in Access to Recovery

grants to provide people seeking drug and alcohol treatment with

vouchers for a range of appropriate community-based services.

By providing vouchers, the grant program promotes client choice,

expands access to a broad array of clinical treatment and recovery

support services, including services provided by faith- and

community-based programs, and increases substance abuse treatment

capacity.

The grants are being awarded to 14 states and one tribal

organization. Three-year grants are being awarded to

California, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana,

Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, Tennessee, Texas, Washington,

Wisconsin, Wyoming, and the California Rural Indian Health Board.

In fiscal year 2005, President Bush has proposed doubling the

funding for Access to Recovery to help even more of those seeking

treatment.

“Giving people the power to choose a treatment program that

reflects their values and needs can help them triumph over

addiction and achieve recovery,” HHS Secretary Tommy G.

Thompson said. “Access to Recovery will help Americans

who are seeking treatment but are unable to obtain care. This

program is designed to help people reach recovery in body, mind,

and heart.”

John Walters, Director of National Drug Control Policy said,

“Treatment works. But addiction is not a one-size-fits-all

disease. This program represents the next step in our ability to

treat this disease, opening the door to a full range of treatment

providers, and offering treatment access to thousands of Americans

who would otherwise remain trapped in the maze of addiction.”

HHS’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services

Administration (SAMHSA) will administer the grant program.

SAMHSA Administrator Charles G. Curie said, “Access to

Recovery is based on the knowledge that there are many pathways to

recovery from addiction. The promise of this initiative --

founded on a belief in individual choice -- is that it ensures the

availability of a full range of treatment options, including the

transforming power of faith. That was the President’s

intent in creating this program in the first place, and requesting

$600 million over three years in his 2003 State of the Union

address.”

In their applications, grantees delineated a process for screening

and determining appropriate services for the individual

client. Clients will be assessed, given a voucher for

identified services, and provided with a list of appropriate

service providers from which to choose. As described below,

grantees proposed a broad range of innovative approaches and target

populations. The grantees were competitively chosen

from applications from 44 states and 22 tribes and territories.

Grantees include:

California -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of

three years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. The

state program will address the most critical treatment need in the

state -- service for substance abusing youth between 12 and 20

years of age. The program will target four cities -- Los

Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco. California

will provide incentives to programs based upon consumer

satisfaction and client outcomes. The program will expand

clinical treatment and recovery support capability to

nontraditional providers, such as faith-based organizations.

Connecticut -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each

of three years for a total of approximately $22.8 million.

Connecticut’s program will target at-risk, nondependent adult

populations ages 18 and older, who are at increased risk of

continued substance use or abuse, as well as adults with substance

use disorders. The program will emphasize populations

documented to have significant barriers to access to care, service

use and successful treatment outcomes, such as criminal justice,

adults involved in the child welfare system and racially or

culturally diverse populations. Connecticut will offer a

choice through a provider network that includes a variety of

traditional and non-traditional providers, including those who are

faith and peer-based.

Florida -- Awarded $6.8 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $20.4 million. Florida

will focus on individuals involved with the criminal justice

system, families putting children at risk, or other high-risk

populations such as persons with co-occurring disorders and

individuals, including older adults, who abuse prescription

drugs. The Florida program involves partnerships with

Florida’s Faith-Based Association, the Florida Alcohol and

Drug Abuse Association, the Southern Coast Addiction Technology

Transfer Center, and the NET Training Institute.

Idaho -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. The Idaho

program is designed to expand the state’s continuum of

treatment services. It will reach people currently not able

to receive services. The program will provide the

state’s first opportunity to self-select a provider from a

menu of assessment, clinical treatment and recovery support service

providers. Idaho is involving faith community recovery

advocates, community and tribal health clinics, community and

tribal social services providers and state services in its system.

Illinois -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. The state

expects to implement a continuum of clinical treatment and recovery

support services for probationers. The program expects to

serve probationers in Cook County as well as in Illinois’

Fifth and Sixth Judicial Circuits and the ten counties immediately

adjacent to them, which is a mixed rural and small urban area in

the eastern part of Central Illinois. Illinois had 47

organizations participate in an Access to Recovery planning

meeting, including a number of faith-based organizations that are

not currently funded by the state.

Louisiana -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $22.8 million to create an

electronic voucher system to provide clients with a freedom of

choice for clinical treatment and recovery support services.

The initiative will focus on women, women with dependent children

and adolescents. Identified gaps in treatment services will

be closed through collaboration with providers from the public and

private sector, as well as non-profit and faith-based

organizations. “Set Free Indeed,” a faith-based

ministry in Baton Rouge, will provide assistance needed by other

faith-based agencies to implement faith-based practices and become

licensed as providers by the state.

Missouri -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $22.8 million to implement a

statewide voucher system for adults that affords genuine, free and

independent choice among an increased number of qualified service

providers; provides recovery support services through traditional,

non-traditional and faith-based organizations; expands the existing

managed care system for proper control and monitoring; and measures

outcomes in seven critical domains.

New Jersey -- Awarded approximately $4 million per year for

each of three years for a total of approximately $12.2

million. The program will provide choice and increase

outpatient treatment capacity and expand day programs. The

state expects to assess those on existing waiting lists to

determine appropriate interventions, and provide placements.

The initiative will consist of a network of service providers

inclusive of faith-based programs, licensed substance abuse

treatment programs, recovery ministries, social service agencies,

shelters, legal services, vocational and educational services, and

others.

New Mexico -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of

three years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. New

Mexico will increase and enhance clinical treatment and recovery

support services and offer client choice through the implementation

of a voucher system. The new program will enhance the City of

Albuquerque’s existing voucher system and replicate that

system in Santa Fe County, Dona Ana County (Las Cruces) and in Five

Sandoval Indian Pueblos, Inc. Catholic Charities’

statewide Stone Soup Collaborative will lead an effort to increase

the state’s capacity to offer increased choices in recovery

support services through faith-based and community-based

organizations.

Tennessee -- Awarded $5.9 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $17.8 million. The goal of

the Tennessee program is to maintain abstinence by supplying

vouchers for assessment, substance abuse clinical treatment and/or

recovery services. The program will provide client choice

among substance abuse clinical treatment and recovery support

providers while expanding access to service options, including

faith-based options, and increasing the number of state-authorized

substance abuse providers.

Texas -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. Texas will

focus on access and recovery needs of eligible drug court

offenders. Services available through the Texas voucher

system include assessment, clinical treatment and recovery support

provided through a network of multiple drug courts. Voucher

recipients will be afforded genuine, free and independent choice

among service options, including faith-based organizations.

Washington -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of

three years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. The

state plans to utilize its Access to Recovery grant to provide

clinical drug and alcohol treatment and recovery services to

low-income individuals in crisis who are involved with Child

Protective Services, shelters and supported housing, free and low

income medical clinics and community detoxification programs.

The program will offer a full range of treatment services and

increase the number of providers trained and qualified to offer

recovery services, particularly faith-based.

Wisconsin -- Awarded $7.6 million per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $22.8 million. The

Wisconsin program will expand capacity and enhance

Milwaukee’s current voucher system for people with substance

use disorders. Collaboration with faith-based and community

coalitions will lead to a greatly expanded choice of providers for

clinical treatment and recovery support services, and the ability

to monitor the system for effectiveness.

Wyoming -- Awarded $978,000 per year for each of three

years for a total of approximately $2.9 million. This program will

expand treatment capacity for adolescents and their families;

improve accountability in service delivery; and create an

integrated clinical treatment and recovery support services

system. The adolescents targeted will be those involved with

the criminal justice system. The state is establishing

mechanisms for allowing participation by previously ineligible

providers, particularly community-based and faith-based providers.

California Rural Indian Health Board -- Awarded $5.7 million

per year for each of three years for a total of approximately $17.1

million. This coalition of California tribes, tribal and

urban Indian health professionals, and substance abuse clinical

treatment and recovery support service providers is seeking to

provide every American Indian or Alaska Native in California with a

substance abuse problem access to treatment opportunities that will

foster recovery. The program will allow patients to select

among Indian and non-Indian providers of services; traditional

native spiritual and mainstream faith-based services; restrictive

or non-restrictive environments; and discrete or wrap-around

services.